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Germany - Third Reich: The Extremely Rare Russian Front Leningrad Posthumous Award Certificate for the Iron Cross 1st Class with accompanying Wehrpass contained in the Next of Kin white cover, as awarded to Oberleutnant Ernst-Günther Graichen, 7th Battery

£1,450.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/28030
Condition: Good Condition, evidence of age and use
Description:

Germany - Third Reich: The Extremely Rare Russian Front Leningrad Posthumous Award Certificate for the Iron Cross 1st Class with accompanying Wehrpass contained in the Next of Kin white cover, as awarded to Oberleutnant Ernst-Günther Graichen, 7th Battery, formerly 3rd Battery, 24th Artillery Regiment, a pre-war soldier, who was involved in manning the defences on the Siegfried Line in the West during 1939 to 1940, who was then present during the operations in France in 1940 for which he was awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class on 24th June 1940. Then present during the invasion of Russian and the advance towards Leningrad as part of Army Group North, he remained on the northern front for his service in operations at Leningrad and Volchov. Awarded the General Assault Badge in January 1942 and then commissioned in June 1942 as a Leutnant, he was promoted to Oberleutnant in February 1943, and in the same month was killed in action on 18th February 1943 whilst involved in fighting near Krasny Bor to the southeast of Leningrad. During the action in which he was killed, Graichen was performing a heroic action ‘which led to the sacrifice of his life’ and for this act, was posthumously awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class, gained on 18th February 1943, and awarded to him through the Headquarters of the Army High Command on 15th June 1943. His award document is the extremely rare special posthumous award document, which is hardly ever seen.

1) Extremely Rare Iron Cross 1st Class Posthumous Award Certificate, issued to: ‘Oberleutnant Ernst-Günther Graichen, 7./A.R.24’, - the Iron Cross 1st Class in order to honour the heroic act on 18th February 1943 which led to the sacrifice of his life and to preserve it as a living example for all time to the Nation and Family’, issued through the Headquarters of the Army High Command on 15th June 1943, and signed in ink ‘Burgdorf’ for Wilhelm Emanuel Burgdorf, as Generalmajor, recipient of the Knight’s Cross on 29th September 1941, later as Chief Adjutant to Adolf Hitler, he played a role in the forced suicide of Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, and then committed suicide in the Führerbunker in Berlin on 2nd May 1945.

With the following document:

2) Wehrpass issued to Ernst-Günther Graichen on 18th February 1937 in Plauen / Vogtland, with good large format ID photo of the recipient on page 2. Confirms his service and awards. The Wehrpass has the special issued to the Next of Kin “Fallen in Action” - “Für Führer, Volk und Vaterland” white cover as issued by the Plauen (Vogtland) Recruiting District Headquarters.

Ernst-Günther Graichen was born on 15th November 1917 in Kiel as the son of Ernst and Rosa Graichen, and attended an Elementary School and finally a Grammar School, before serving with the German Labour Service from 3rd April to 23rd October 1937. He then enlisted into the German Army on 2nd November 1937 in Plauen in Vogtland and joined the 24th Artillery Regiment, seeing service variously with the 3rd and 7th Batteries for the entirety of his career, with the exception of one or two detached duties whilst on active service during the war.

Promoted to Gefreiter on 1st November 1938, and to Unteroffizier on 1st June 1939, followed by Wachtmeister on 1st March 1940, he was involved in the manning of the defences on the Siegfried Line in the West during 1939 to 1940, and for this service was awarded the West Wall Medal on 1st March 1940 whilst serving with the 3rd Battery. Having taken part in the invasion of France with the 3rd Battery, he was awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class on 24th June 1940, and then went on to take part in the invasion of Russia in 1941 and the advance on Leningrad as part of Army Group North, being with the 7th Battery when awarded the General Assault Badge on 30th January 1942.

Commissioned as a Leutnant on 16th June 1942, and then seeing further service with the 7th Battery, he was promoted to Oberleutnant on 1st February 1943, and then killed in action on 18th February 1943 whilst involved in fighting near Krasny Bor to the southeast of Leningrad. During the action in which he was killed, Graichen was performing a heroic action ‘which led to the sacrifice of his life’ and for this act, was posthumously awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class, gained on 18th February 1943, and awarded to him through the Headquarters of the Army High Command on 15th June 1943. His award document is the extremely rare special posthumous award document, which is hardly ever seen.