Germany - Imperial German Empire, Prussia, Baden, Hamburg and Kingdom of Greece: Group of 6 awards comprising: Iron Cross 1914 2nd Class; Prussia: Medal of Honour of the Prussian Red Cross 3rd Class, 1916-1921 issue, zinc alloy form for a version issued from July 1917 onwards; Baden: Cross for Voluntary War Aid 1914-1916; Hamburg: Hanseatic Cross 1914-1918; Honour Cross 1914-1918 without Swords, reverse makers marked with entwined ‘RS’; Greece - Kingdom of: Royal Order of the Redeemer, Knight Grade, 1863-1975 issue, silver, gold and enamels. Mo

Price: £475.00


Product ID: CMA/27470
Condition: evidence of wear, the enamel work however in good condition, Good Very Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

Germany - Imperial German Empire, Prussia, Baden, Hamburg and Kingdom of Greece: Group of 6 awards comprising: Iron Cross 1914 2nd Class; Prussia: Medal of Honour of the Prussian Red Cross 3rd Class, 1916-1921 issue, zinc alloy form for a version issued from July 1917 onwards; Baden: Cross for Voluntary War Aid 1914-1916; Hamburg: Hanseatic Cross 1914-1918; Honour Cross 1914-1918 without Swords, reverse makers marked with entwined ‘RS’; Greece - Kingdom of: Royal Order of the Redeemer, Knight Grade, 1863-1975 issue, silver, gold and enamels. Mounted German court style as worn, ribbons all bearing a matching fade, the backing cloth also period to the mounting from the late 1930’s period. A rare combination of awards.

Condition: evidence of wear, the enamel work however in good condition, Good Very Fine.

Prussia was officially represented at the conference held in Geneva from 26th to 29th October 1863 and its Red Cross Society was formed shortly after, making it one of the earliest societies. In 1864, Prussia was one of the original twelve signatories of the Geneva Convention. The Medal of Honour of the Prussian Red Cross was created in 1897 for service to the Prussian Red Cross Society. On 23rd May 1916 a Royal Decree instructed that all medals were to be made in iron (rather than bronze) as from September of that year. On 27 October 1916 a further Royal Decree commanded that the medal be made of ‘Kriegsmetall’ (zinc alloy) from July 1917. The medal was issued in both these metals until 1921.

The Baden Cross for Voluntary War Aid was instituted on 24th December 1915, its design and award based on that of the cross for 1870-1871, itself instituted on 25th June 1871 following the Franco-Prussian War. The cross was awarded to both men and women who rendered outstanding service in tending the sick and wounded.

Each of the three ancient Hanseatic Cities – Bremen, Hamburg and Lübeck – issued a cross of similar design in the First World War, differing only in the arms on the central medallion of the face, that for Hamburg, the Hamburg Hanseatic Cross being instituted on 10th September 1915. Hamburg suffered 40,000 casualties during the war, from a total population of 800,000. The Cross was suppressed at the end of 1918.
The fourth National Assembly of the Hellenes resolved on 31st July 1829 to create the Order of the Redeemer to reward those who had fought for and supported the Greek war for independence. However, it was not until after the arrival in the newly independent kingdom of Greece of King Otho I that the Order was finally instituted by Royal Decree published on 22nd May 1833. The Order was amended in 1863 by the new King George I, the head of King Otho being replaced by that of the Redeemer. The Order remained unchanged until 1975 when the crown suspension was replaced by a wreath of oak and laurel following the abolition of the monarchy. The Order remains the highest honour of Greece.