Great War German Spring Offensive Lewis gunner’s Military Medal and gazetted French Croix de Guerre group awarded to Sergeant W. Morris, 1st/8th Battalion - Ardwick, Lancashire Fusiliers, Territorial Force, formerly 19th Service Battalion - 4th City Pals, Manchester Regiment, who saw service out on the Western Front from 23rd November 1915, and on the disbandment of the 19th Battalion then transferred to the 1st/8th Battalion in February 1918, and won his Military Medal most probably on 25th March 1918 during the attack on and retreat from the

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Product ID: CMA/28422
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
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Description:

Great War German Spring Offensive Lewis gunner’s Military Medal and gazetted French Croix de Guerre group awarded to Sergeant W. Morris, 1st/8th Battalion - Ardwick, Lancashire Fusiliers, Territorial Force, formerly 19th Service Battalion - 4th City Pals, Manchester Regiment, who saw service out on the Western Front from 23rd November 1915, and on the disbandment of the 19th Battalion then transferred to the 1st/8th Battalion in February 1918, and won his Military Medal most probably on 25th March 1918 during the attack on and retreat from the villages of Sapignies and Behagnies on the Sapignies-Gommiecourt Road, when he was ‘conspicuous for his handling of his Lewis gun, with which he did great execution on the advancing hordes’. His French Croix de Guerre, gazetted on 29th January 1918, was won during the Battle of Amiens which lasted from 8th August and 3rd September 1918.

Group of 3: Military Medal, GVR bust; (15261 SJT. W. MORRIS. 1/8 LAN: FUS:); British War Medal; (15261 SJT. W. MORRIS. LAN.FUS.); France: Croix de Guerre, reverse dated 1914 to 1918.

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Walter Morris came from Harpurhey, Manchester, and saw service during the Great War as a Private later Sergeant (No.15261) initially with the 19th Service Battalion - 4ht City Pals, Manchester Regiment, and was present out on the Western Front from 23rd November 1915. His battalion was disbanded in France on 6th February 1918, and Morris then found himself transferred to the 1st/8th Battalion - Ardwick, Lancashire Fusiliers, Territorial Force, a part of the 126th Brigade in the East Lancashire Division.

Morris was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 16th July 1918 which confirms an award won during the German Spring Offensive, and research indicates that it was won during the fighting along the Sapignies-Gommiecourt Road on the 25th March 1918 when his battalion came under heavy attack after capturing the villages of Sapignies and Behagnies. In the afternoon the battalion was forced to withdraw in the face of overwhelming numbers of the enemy, and suffered heavy casualties with one officer killed, 7 wounded, and 210 other ranks being killed, wounded or missing.

At the time he earned his award, Morris was serving as a Lewis gunner, and the recommendation for his award survives amongst the research. ‘Sergeant W. Morris was also conspicuous for his handling of his Lewis gun, with which he did great execution on the advancing hordes.’

Morris was awarded the French Croix de Guerre in the London Gazette for 29th January 1919, which indicates an award won during the Battle of Amiens which lasted from 8th August and 3rd September 1918.