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Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, GVR Fm. bust, awarded to Sergeant G.H. Loutit, 1st Infantry Battalion, Railways and Harbours Brigade, formerly a Trooper with the 3rd Victorian Bushmen as a member of the 3rd Australian Contin

£275.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/27382
Condition: some edge bruising, about Very Fine
Description:

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, GVR Fm. bust, awarded to Sergeant G.H. Loutit, 1st Infantry Battalion, Railways and Harbours Brigade, formerly a Trooper with the 3rd Victorian Bushmen as a member of the 3rd Australian Contingent during the Boer War. He originally came from the small gold mining town of Walhalla in Victoria, Australia, where his father, originally Scottish, worked for the Long Tunnel Gold Mine. Having served during the Boer War on operations in the Transvaal and then in Rhodesia at some stage during the period from 11th October 1899 to 17th May 1900, as an engine driver, he subsequently appears to have settled in South Africa, and then joined the 1st Infantry Battalion, South African Railways and Harbours Brigade.

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, GVR Fm. bust; (NO 70948 SJT G.H. LOUTIT. 1ST. (INFY) BATTN R&H. BGE.)

Condition: some edge bruising, about Very Fine.

George Henry Loutit was born in 1877 in Walhalla, Victoria, Australia, the son of a Scottish father, David Loutit, and his Cornish wife, Mary, both of whom having originally emigrated to Australia and settled at the small gold mining town of Walhalla, which was them beginning to boom.

His father worked for the Long Tunnel Gold Mine in Walhalla, and in 1887, on the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria, has now a claim to fame in being the producer of what is now known as the ‘Long Tunnel Cannon’, a gun which was made in the workshops of the Long Tunnel Gold Mine, the intention being for it to be fired to celebrate Her Majesty’s Jubilee. The cannon survives to this day, having been rediscovered by members of the Walhalla Heritage and Development League.

Loutit became a railway engine driver, a profession he is shown as in circa 1900, though presumably he did not work locally, as Walhalla, which is in the region of Gippsland, some 180 kilometres from Melbourne, did not get linked up by rail till 1910, this being the last of four narrow gauge railways built by the Victorian Railways. Loutit himself went on to see service during the Boer War in South Africa with the 3rd Australian Contingent as a Trooper (No.443) with the 3rd Victorian Bushmen, and was present on operations in the Transvaal and then in Rhodesia at some stage during the period from 11th October 1899 to 17th May 1900.

Loutit subsequently settled in South Africa, and presumably continued to work as an engine driver, as well as serving with the Acting Citizen Force as a Sergeant (No.70948) with the 1st Infantry Battalion, Railways and Harbours Brigade, and was awarded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.