Waterloo Campaign 1815 Battle of Quatre Bras Casualty Waterloo Medal 1815, fitted with modified steel clip and straight bar suspension, awarded to Private Daniel Ewart, 1st Battalion, 79th Regiment of Foot - Cameron Highlanders, who was severely w...

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Product ID: CMA/32670
Condition: heavy edge bruise to obverse rim at 5 o’clock, Good Very Fine.
Description:

Waterloo Campaign 1815 Battle of Quatre Bras Casualty Waterloo Medal 1815, fitted with modified steel clip and straight bar suspension, awarded to Private Daniel Ewart, 1st Battalion, 79th Regiment of Foot - Cameron Highlanders, who was severely wounded in action at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16th June 1815, when forming part of Captain J.S. Christie’s, and subsequently Lieutenant John Powling’s No.2 Company, in an action in which his first company commander was wounded and his second was killed. Fighting as part of the 5th Division, it was a very bloody encounter, and the Cameron Highlanders threw back a French infantry attack at bayonet point, but took heavy casualties from artillery fire and cavalry attacks.

Waterloo Medal 1815, fitted with modified steel clip and straight bar suspension; (DANIEL EWART. 1ST BATT. 79TH REG. FOOT.), with remnants of original ribbon.

Condition: heavy edge bruise to obverse rim at 5 o’clock, Good Very Fine.

Daniel Ewart was born in 1798 and originally enlisted into the British Army on 2nd June 1812 and saw service as a Private with the 1st Battalion, 79th Regiment of Foot - Cameron Highlanders. He went on to form part of Captain J.S. Christie’s, and subsequently Lieutenant John Powling’s No.2 Company during the Waterloo Campaign in 1815.

Following the Peninsular War and the abdication of Napoleon in April 1814, the 1st/79th Regiment moved to Cork, Ireland. However, with the return of Napoleon from exile, the 79th Foot travelled to Belgium in May 1815. The regiment took part in the final battles of the Napoleonic Wars at Quatre Bras and Waterloo in June 1815.

During this campaign, the 1st Battalion, 79th Foot formed part of Major General Sir James Kempt’s 8th British Brigade in Lieutenant General Sir Thomas Picton’s Reserve 5th Division, and it was during the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16th June 1815 that Daniel Ewart was severely wounded in action.

At Quatre Bras, which preceded Waterloo by two days, a very bloody encounter occurred at a vital crossroads a few miles south of the more famous battlefield. British and allied units stopped the French advance northwards towards Brussels, but at a terrible price for the Scottish regiments fighting in the 5th Division, including the 79th (Cameron Highlanders), the 92nd Regiment (Gordon Highlanders) and the 42nd Regiment (Black Watch).

The Cameron Highlanders threw back a French infantry attack at bayonet point, but took heavy casualties from artillery fire and cavalry attacks. By the end of the day one account reads: ‘the shattered remnants of the 79th still occupied the position it had held so nobly through out the day, but notwithstanding its exhausted state, no sooner were orders for a general advance heard than the same unconquered spirit of enthusiasm appeared to animate both officers and men.

The battalion commander, 14 other officers, 12 sergeants and about 250 other ranks were wounded at Quatre Bras. Some 25 rank and file were killed, along with two officers. One of the two officers killed was Ewart’s second company commander, Lieutenant Rowling, who died of wounds, having himself assumed command after Captain Christie had been wounded.