The very fine India Gwalior Campaign 1843 Battle of Punniar, Indian Mutiny Oudh Campaign 1858 and long service group with some original service documents, as awarded to Private George Moore, 3rd East Kent Regiment of Foot - the Buffs, later 39th D...

£1,350.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/31741
Condition: first with a modified silver back plate which partially covers the naming, though it is still clear, the first also polished
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    Description:

    The very fine India Gwalior Campaign 1843 Battle of Punniar, Indian Mutiny Oudh Campaign 1858 and long service group with some original service documents, as awarded to Private George Moore, 3rd East Kent Regiment of Foot - the Buffs, later 39th Dorsetshire Regiment of Foot from 1844, and 32nd Cornwall Regiment of Foot from 1857. Moore was present out in India with the Buffs from January 1840, and was then present in action during the Gwalior Campaign at the Battle of Punniar on 29th December 1843. Having volunteered for transfer to the Dorset’s in October 1844, he went on to see home service on garrison duty in Ireland, and having then volunteered to transfer to the Cornwall Light Infantry in January 1857, arrived out in India later in 1857 after the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, therefore missing his regiment’s participation in the defence of Lucknow. Employed as the servant to Lieutenant Henry Sparke Stabb, he was present with Colonel Maxwell’s Column in the operations before Calpee early in 1858, and at the capture of the entrenched positions at Dehaighn and the fort at Tyrool in August 1858 during the Oudh Campaign.

    Group of 3: Punniar Star 1843, fitted with a silver straight bar suspension, reverse engraved; (PRIVATE GEORGE MOORE H.M. 3RD. REGT:), this fitted with a modified silver back plate which partially covers the naming, and also a silver straight bar suspension, the obverse of which is engraved: ‘29th: Decr: 1843’; Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-1859, no clasp; (G. MOORE, 32ND. L.I.); Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, Victoria small letter reverse with swivelling scroll suspension, impressed naming; (30. G. MOORE. 32ND. REGT.)

    Condition: first with a modified silver back plate which partially covers the naming, though it is still clear, the first also polished for extensive wear to the highlights on the obverse, otherwise the latter two have light contact wear, overall about Very Fine.

    Together with the following original documentation:

    British Army Parchment Certificate of Discharge, issued to George Moore, dated 18th June 1861.

    Certificate of Admittance as an Out-Pensioner of Her Majesty’s Royal Hospital at Chelsea, issued to George Moore, dated 18th June 1861.

    Letter of recommendation from Lieutenant Henry Sparke Stabb, Adjutant of the 32nd Foot, to whom Moore had been the servant for the previous three years up to his discharge, this dated 2nd July 1861.

    Also remnants of the recipient’s original medal ribbons.

    George Moore was born in Norwich, Norfolk, and having worked as a labourer, then attested for service with the British Army at Rochester on 23rd August 1839, joining as a Private (No.1277) the 3rd East Kent Regiment of Foot - the Buffs. Moore went on to serve for 21 years and 283 days, of which 9 years and 10 months would be spent on overseas service in India, arriving at Calcutta on 22nd January 1840, and joining his regiment at Meerut. From March 1841 he was on service at Kumaul, and from April 1842 was at Deynah Dhoan, before moving later that same year to Mussoorie and then to Amballa.

    Moore was present in mid 1843 at Allahabad, and with the launching of the Gwalior Campaign, was then present at the Battle of Punniar on 29th December 1843, before returning to duty at Allahabad.

    Having volunteered, he subsequently transferred as a Private (No.1926) to the 39th Dorsetshire Regiment of Foot on 15th October 1844, and then saw service at Dinapore, till post home aboard the transport ship ‘Pekin’ in early 1847. On his arrival home, he was stationed variously in England at Barnsley, Hull, and Preston, before moving to Ireland in mid 1850, where he was stationed variously at Belfast, Newry, Dublin, Clonmel, Cork, Kinsale and Limerick, and in 1854 to 1855 was employed at Limerick on recruiting duty.

    Having then once again volunteered, he transferred as a Private (No.30) to the 32nd Cornwall Regiment of Foot on 1st January 1857, joining it at Chatham with the Depot Company. As such Moore saw further service out in India, forming a replacement draft which embarked at Chatham on 31st July 1857 shortly after the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny. Having not been present at the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, he was not one of those who defended Lucknow from July to November 1857, nore was he one of the thirty men of his regiment who was caught up in the Cawnpore Massacre, but in early 1858 he was stationed at Cawnpore, and then moved to Purtabghur in April, and between July and September 1858 is listed as in camp at Baylah, and from October to December 1858 is listed in camp at Hullowlie. Moore is also confirmed as having been present in action at the capture of the Forts’ at Dehaighn and Tyrool in August 1858 during the Oudh Campaign. At this stage he was servant to one Lieutenant Henry Sparke Stabb, whose officer’s service indicate that he was present with Colonel Maxwell’s Column in the operations before Calpee early in 1858, and proceeded with it to the Alumbagh during the taking of Lucknow in March 1858, being then present at the capture of the entrenched positions at Dehaighn and the fort at Tyrool, actions of Doadpore and Jugdespore, surrender of the forts at Ahmetie and Shunkerpore, and pursuit of Beni Madhoo across the River Gogra. Like Moore, Stabb would also receive the Indian Mutiny Medal without clasp.

    In the spring of 1859 Moore was embarked for England once again, and arrived at Dover later that year. Moore was awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal circa August 1859 and was discharged ‘free’ to pension on 18th June 1861, his intended place of residence being Canterbury in Kent, and he was also admitted as an Out-Pensioner of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea.

    On his discharge, the regimental adjutant, Lieutenant Henry Sparke Stabb, had written Moore a reference on 2nd July 1861, which reads that “Private George Moore 32nd Light Infantry has been my servant for about 3 years and I can confidently recommend him as a thoroughly honest and hard working man. He has ever borne an excellent character during the time he has been a soldier (over 21 years) for sobriety and regularity of conduct. He had at the time of discharge four Good Conduct Rings and a Good Conduct Medal.’ Confirmed as Moore’s full medal entitlement.