The superb Second World War Anzio Beachhead night of the 9th to 10th February 1944 ‘immediate’ Military Medal group awarded to Corporal and Lance Sergeant D.C. McKay, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, who was present in action at Anzio from the original landings in January 1944, and on the beachhead on the night of the 9th to 10th February 1944 when his company manning a forward position found itself surrounded during an enemy counter-attack, was instrumental during the 500 yard fight back to rejoin the remainder of the battalion, the 500 yard dash

Price: £2,850.00


Product ID: CMA/28356
Condition: Good Very Fine
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Description:

The superb Second World War Anzio Beachhead night of the 9th to 10th February 1944 ‘immediate’ Military Medal group awarded to Corporal and Lance Sergeant D.C. McKay, 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, who was present in action at Anzio from the original landings in January 1944, and on the beachhead on the night of the 9th to 10th February 1944 when his company manning a forward position found itself surrounded during an enemy counter-attack, was instrumental during the 500 yard fight back to rejoin the remainder of the battalion, the 500 yard dash being achieved through ground strongly held by the enemy, and also covered by machine guns and tanks on either flank. Despite these obstacles, he was the first to leap from his trench when the word was given, and dashing across the open he led his section towards the cover of a ditch. This proved to be full of enemy, but he jumped in firing his Tommy gun killing at least three enemy and forcing the rest to surrender. Driving the prisoners ahead of him as he continued the rush, pausing only to finish off a German officer who was grappling with the Platoon Commander, his great dash and gallantry completely demoralised the enemy company whose position he had to pass through, and against seemingly hopeless odds he brought his whole section through with only one man killed.

Group of 5: Military Medal, GVI 1st type bust; (2820512. L.SJT. D.C. McKAY. S.GDS.); 1939-1945 Star; Italy Star; Defence Medal; War Medal. Mounted swing style as worn.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Together with Buckingham Palace forwarding letter for the Military Medal, this with typed details for: ‘2820512. L.Sjt. D.C. McKay. M.M. Scots Guards.’, and the accompanying outer card box for the award.

David Campbell McKay came from Rogart in Sutherland, Scotland, and then saw service during the Second World War in the Italian campaign as a Corporal and unpaid Lance Sergeant (No.2820512) with the 1st Battalion, Scots Guards, being present in action at Anzio from the original landings in January 1944, it was on the beachhead on the night of the 9th to 10th February 1944 that McKay won his Military Medal when his company found itself surrounded during an enemy counter-attack, and had to then fight its way out over 500 yards to rejoin the remainder of the battalion.
The original recommendation for an immediate award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal and subsequently downgraded to an immediate award of the Military Medal reads as follows: ‘Anzio Beachhead. During the night of 9th - 10th February, Lance Sergeant McKay’s company was holding a forward position when the enemy counter-attack was in full swing. At dawn they found themselves completely surrounded and were ordered to fight their way out. The 500 yards between them and the remainder of the Battalion was not only strongly held by the enemy but was also covered by machine guns and tanks on either flank. Although the chances of getting through seemed to be nil, this Lance Sergeant was the first to leap from his trench when the word was given. Dashing across the open he led his section towards the cover of a ditch. This proved to be full of enemy, but he jumped in firing his Tommy gun killing at least three enemy and forcing the rest to surrender. Driving the prisoners ahead of him as he continued the rush, pausing only to finish off a German officer who was grappling with the Platoon Commander. His great dash and gallantry completely demoralised the enemy company whose position he had to pass through, and against seemingly hopeless odds he brought his whole section through with only one man killed.’

McKay was awarded his ‘immediate’ award of the Military Medal in the London Gazette for 15th June 1944.