The superb Great War Third Battle of Ypres Poelcappelle 9th October 1917 Distinguished Conduct Medal and Imperial Service Medal group awarded to Sergeant C.A. Watch, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, formerly Gloucestershire Regiment, who was p...

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Product ID: CMA/32163
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Description:

The superb Great War Third Battle of Ypres Poelcappelle 9th October 1917 Distinguished Conduct Medal and Imperial Service Medal group awarded to Sergeant C.A. Watch, 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, formerly Gloucestershire Regiment, who was present with the Gloster’s out on the Western Front from March 1915, and then having transferred to the 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers, was awarded a superb Distinguished Conduct Medal for his actions during his battalion’s attack from the area of Imbros House towards enemy positions to the left of Poelcappelle on 9th October 1917. The battalion advanced across a 200 yard frontage, with Imbros House being in its centre. There were three objectives but owing to resistance on the right by rifle fire, the battalion consolidated between the first and second objectives, having advanced roughly 500 yards. It was around the stage that the battalion reached its maximum stage of the advance that Watch displayed conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When an enemy machine-gun post was seriously affecting the left of the line, he collected three men, and rushed it, putting the gun out of action and capturing two officers and twenty-five men. At the end of the attack the party, Watch and his three men with their 27 prisoners, found themselves in enemy lines, but though a barrage was put on it by our artillery, they succeeded in making their way back to our lines. Watch later went on to work as a Skilled Labourer for the Home Civil Service in the Admiralty, being based at Holton Heath, which was the location of the Royal Naval Cordite Factory. It was for this work that he was awarded the Imperial Service Medal in the London Gazette for 20th March 1959.

Group of 5: Distinguished Conduct Medal, GVR 1st type bust; (40603 A.SJT: C.A. WATCH. 2/LANC: FUS:); 1914-1915 Star; (3396 PTE. C.A. WATCH. GLOUC.R.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (3396 SJT. C.A. WATCH. GLOUC.R.); Imperial Service Medal, EIIR Dei.Grat. bust; (CHARLES WATCH), mounted court style for display.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Charles A. Watch came from Shepton Mallet, Somerset, and saw service during the Great War initially as a Private later Sergeant with the Gloucestershire Regiment, and was present out on the Western Front from 31st March 1915, which indicates he was then probably one of the Territorial Force battalions members of either the 1st/4th, 1st/5th or 1st/6th Battalion’s which arrived in France about this time.

Having then transferred as an Acting Sergeant (No.40603) to the 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, Watch was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal in the London Gazette for 6th February 1918, the award being made for his gallantry in action during the Third Battle of Ypres when in action at Poelcappelle on 9th October 1917 during a battalion attack from the area of Imbros House.

The War Diary records that: ‘Battalion attacked on a frontage of 200 yards with its centre on Imbros House, “A” Company right front, “C” Company left front, “B” Support, “D” Reserve. Zero hour 5.20 a.m.. The Battalion advanced about 400 yards (right) 600 yards (left) in advance of our own front line. There were three objectives but owing to resistance on the right by rifle fire, the battalion consolidated between the first and second objectives.’ Casualties were fairly high, with three officers killed, eight officers wounded and one missing; and 33 others ranks killed, and 126 other ranks wounded and 41 missing. The following day the battalion consolidated its position on the left of Poelcappelle.

The citation reads as follows: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When an enemy machine-gun post was seriously affecting the left of the line, he collected three men, and rushed it, putting the gun out of action and capturing two officers and twenty-five men. At the end of the attack the party found themselves in enemy lines, but though a barrage was put on it by our artillery, they succeeded in making their way back to our lines.’

Watch went on to work post-war with the Home Civil Service in the Admiralty as a Skill Labourer at Holton Heath, which was the location of the Royal Naval Cordite Factory. It was for this work that he was awarded the Imperial Service Medal in the London Gazette for 20th March 1959.