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The rare Wakefield Gold Medal for the destruction of Zeppelin L15, housed in its fitted presentation case, as awarded to Lieutenant W.H. Moffatt, Royal Garrison Artillery, formerly Royal Field Artillery, Territorial Force, who originally saw service at Gallipoli, but was then one of the gun crews who were involved in shooting down the Zeppelin L15 which was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire over London on the night of 31st March to 1st April 1916. He ultimately ended up with the Duke of Cornwall’s Battery and lived in St Austell’s in Cornw

Price: £2,250.00


Product ID: CMA/29390
Condition:: Nearly extremely fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

The rare Wakefield Gold Medal for the destruction of Zeppelin L15, housed in its fitted presentation case, as awarded to Lieutenant W.H. Moffatt, Royal Garrison Artillery, formerly Royal Field Artillery, Territorial Force, who originally saw service at Gallipoli, but was then one of the gun crews who were involved in shooting down the Zeppelin L15 which was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire over London on the night of 31st March to 1st April 1916. He ultimately ended up with the Duke of Cornwall’s Battery and lived in St Austell’s in Cornwall.

The Lord Mayor of the City of London, Sir Charles Wakefield's Gold Medal, obverse centre Wakefield's arms within inscription 'Presented by the Lord Mayor Colonel Sir Charles Wakefield', reverse, gun and L15 above two scrolls reading 'Well Hit' and 'March 31st - April 1st 1916', reverse field inscribed with name of recipient ‘Lieut. W.H. Moffatt’, 9 carat gold hallmarks for Birmingham 1916. In original issued state, and housed in its original Mappin and Webb presentation case.

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

William Harold Moffatt saw service during the Great War initially as a Lieutenant with the Royal Field Artillery, Territorial Force, and was present at Gallipoli during 1915. Subsequently promoted to Lieutenant and temporary Captain, he transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery, and saw home service, being a number of the gun crews who were involved in shooting down the Zeppelin L15 which was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire over London on the night of 31st March to 1st April 1916, and plunged into the sea a mile from the Kentish Knock Lightship shortly after midnight. The 17 survivors were taken aboard H.M.S. Vulture, but not before being stripped naked by order of the ship's Captain.

The Lord Mayor of the City of London created the Sir Charles Wakefield Gold Medal. It was created and awarded as the result of a bounty offered by Sir Charles Wakefield to the first gun's crew to shoot down a Zeppelin on domestic soil. Due to the fact that a number of gun crews were involved in shooting down the L15, it was decided that the money would instead be spent on the production of gold medals to present to each individual member of the crews involved.

Moffat subsequently saw service with the Duke of Cornwall’s Battery, his home being located at St Austell’s in Cornwall, and he went on to be awarded the Silver War Badge on 28th September 1918.