The rare South Atlantic 1982 Falklands War Submariner’s long service pair awarded to Marine Engineering Mechanic (Mechanical) P.A. Taylor, Royal Navy, who was present during the conflict aboard the Oberon class submarine Onyx, the smallest and on...

£2,450.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/31470
Condition: Good Very Fine
Description:

The rare South Atlantic 1982 Falklands War Submariner’s long service pair awarded to Marine Engineering Mechanic (Mechanical) P.A. Taylor, Royal Navy, who was present during the conflict aboard the Oberon class submarine Onyx, the smallest and only non-nuclear submarine to operate down there. Taylor was one of 68 crew aboard the vessel. Onyx went south with a special 5 man diving chamber and fully armed with 10 torpedoes. The smaller displacement of Onyx compared to the nuclear submarines made her ideal for landing SBS marines ashore on the islands in shallow waters. During one of these missions, Onyx hit an uncharted pinnacle while submerged at 150 feet and suffered minor damage to her bow. Other claims are the damage was inflicted by one of two torpedoes dropped by an Argentine Navy S-2E Tracker from ARA Veinticinco de Mayo, an Argenintian aircraft carrier operating 70 nautical miles off the Argentine coast. Postwar, Onyx sank the hulk of the landing ship Sir Galahad with a Mk 8 Torpedo, the Sir Galahad having been damaged beyond repair during an Argentine Air Force raid at Fitzroy and Bluff Cove.

South Atlantic Medal 1982 with Rosette; (MEM(M)1 P A TAYLOR D167216A HMS ONYX); Royal Navy Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, EIIR Dei.Grat. bust; (LMEM(M) P A TAYLOR D167216A RN), mounted swing style as worn.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Awarded to Marine Engineering Mechanic (Mechanical) (No.D.167216A) P.A. Taylor, Royal Navy, who saw service during the Falklands War in 1982 aboard the Oberon class submarine Onyx, the smallest and only non-nuclear submarine to operate down there. Taylor was one of 68 crew aboard the vessel.

The diesel submarine went south with a special 5 man diving chamber and fully armed with 10 MK 24, 2 Mk 20 and 11 Mk 8 torpedoes. The smaller displacement of Onyx compared to the nuclear submarines made her ideal for landing SBS marines ashore on the islands in shallow waters. During one of these missions, Onyx hit an uncharted pinnacle while submerged at 150 feet (46m) and suffered minor damage to her bow. Other claims are the damage was inflicted by one of two torpedoes dropped by an Argentine Navy S-2E Tracker from ARA Veinticinco de Mayo, an Argenintian aircraft carrier operating 70 nautical miles off the Argentine coast, which had been lost by its RN SSN tail. The Tracker S-2 twice detected sub-surface and electronic traces and a MAD contact on 5th to 6th May while searching for the ARA Alférez Sobral, an Argentine ocean going tug, which was out of contact after being hit by Sea Skua missiles launched by Lynx helicopters. Contrary to some reports, after the British cancelled Operation Mikado, there was never a plan to use Onyx to land the SAS in order to destroy Argentina's remaining stockpile of Exocet missiles. Prior to the submarine being damaged the SBS had been embarked to attack a mainland airfield but this operation, too, was cancelled.

Postwar, Onyx sank the hulk of the landing ship Sir Galahad with a Mk 8 Torpedo after firing two Mk 24 Tigerfish, the second Tigerfish, after a ten-minute delay, at the hulk; both failed to explode probably due to torpedo battery faults. Sir Galahad had been damaged beyond repair during an Argentine Air Force raid at Fitzroy and Bluff Cove.

Onyx returned home to the United Kingdom at the end of July 1982. During the conflict she had performed outstandingly well, and 20,000 miles were logged and she was met by cheering crowds as she sailed into harbour.