The rare Second World War Lincolnshire Police Bombing of Louth 7th September 1941 British Empire Medal and subsequent June 1968 Order of the British Empire group awarded to Chief Superintendent Leslie Kirby, Lincolnshire County Police Constabulary, formerly Royal Air Force, who having in 1932 been a recipient of two Royal Tournament prize medals for Bayonet Team Combats, went on to distinguished himself as a Police Constable in Louth on the night of 7th September 1941, when an enemy aircraft attacked and dropped two high explosive bombs at the

Price: £1,850.00


Product ID: CMA/28606
Condition: Good Very Fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

The rare Second World War Lincolnshire Police Bombing of Louth 7th September 1941 British Empire Medal and subsequent June 1968 Order of the British Empire group awarded to Chief Superintendent Leslie Kirby, Lincolnshire County Police Constabulary, formerly Royal Air Force, who having in 1932 been a recipient of two Royal Tournament prize medals for Bayonet Team Combats, went on to distinguished himself as a Police Constable in Louth on the night of 7th September 1941, when an enemy aircraft attacked and dropped two high explosive bombs at the top of Grimsby Road. A house and bungalow were completely destroyed and other houses were badly damaged, with windows shattered and roofs stripped over a wide area. Seven people were killed that night and six others injured. In one of the demolished houses a woman was trapped in the debris, with danger of further collapse. At great risk to his life, Kirby crawled six feet under the debris. There was a very limited space in the tunnel but the Constable, lying prone, was able to get his arms around the victim’s shoulders and was then dragged to safety, bringing the woman with him. Later he rose to Chief Superintendent of the Lincolnshire County Constabulary, and was appointed a Member of the Civil Division of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire on 8th June 1968.

Group of 4: The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Member, M.B.E., 2nd type, Civil Division; British Empire Medal, GVI 1st type cypher, Civil Division; (LESLIE KIRBY); Defence Medal 1939-1945; Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, EIIR Dei.Grat, bust; (SUPT. LESLIE KIRBY)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Together with the following:

Royal Tournament Prize Medal in Silver, hallmarked, inscribed to: ‘1932 Bayonet Team Combats Royal Air Force First Prize Cranwell A.C.2. L. Kirby’.

Royal Tournament Prize Medal in Bronze, inscribed to: ‘R.A.F. Coastal Area Bayt. Team Combats Cranwell A.C.2. Kirby L. 1932’.

A framed photograph of the recipient when a Police Constable with the Lincolnshire County Constabulary.

Leslie Kirby was a pre-war member of the Royal Air Force, and as an Aircraftsman 2nd Class, was a member of the team for the 1932 Bayonet Team Combats category and winning first prize through Cranwell, and in the same year also a member of the RAF Coastal Area team participating in Bayonet Team Combats.

Having then joined the Lincolnshire County Constabulary as a Police Constable, he saw service during the Second World War with the police, and at Grimsby Hill at Louth on the 7th September 1941, he rescued a women trapped under debris, being awarded the British Empire Medal in the London Gazette for 14th November 1941.

This was the second time that Louth was bombed during the war, the first occasion having been on 19th February 1941. A single plane attacked on the night of 7th September, and two high explosive bombs were dropped at the top of Grimsby Road. A house and bungalow were completely destroyed and other houses were badly damaged, with windows shattered and roofs stripped over a wide area. The enemy fighter twice circled the town, at one point swooping low enough to come under machine gun fire. The raider was fought off by British fighter planes and was afterwards brought down in another part of the county. Seven people were killed that night and six others injured.

The citation for Kirby’s award reads as follows: ‘Bombs demolished houses and a woman was trapped in the debris. There was a danger of a further collapse and, at great risk to his life, Constable Kirby crawled six feet under the debris. There was a very limited space in the tunnel but the Constable, lying prone, was able to get his arms around the victim’s shoulders and was then dragged to safety, bringing the woman with him’.

Kirby remained with the Lincolnshire Constabulary after the war, being awarded the Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal whilst a Superintendent, and having been promoted to Chief Superintendent, was then appointed a Member of the Civil Division of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire in the London Gazette for 8th June 1968. His combination of awards is extremely scarce to the Lincolnshire Police.