The interesting General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Malaya, awarded to Lieutenant C.R.W. Adeane, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, a National Serviceman, who then went on to work as a journalist for Beaverbrook Newspapers, and run for Conservative Parliamentary candidate for Erith and Crayford, before dying in the Innsbruck Air Disaster on 29th February 1964.

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The interesting General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Malaya, awarded to Lieutenant C.R.W. Adeane, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, a National Serviceman, who then went on to work as a journalist for Beaverbrook Newspapers, and run for Conservative Parliamentary candidate for Erith and Crayford, before dying in the Innsbruck Air Disaster on 29th February 1964.    General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Malaya; (LT. C.R.W. ADEANE. K.O.Y.L.I.), with original named box of issue. Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine. Charles Raymond Wyndham Adeane was born on 30th March 1930 in Brabraham, Cambridgeshire, the eldest son of Colonel Sir Robert Phillip Wyndham Adeane, and his first wife, Joyce Violet, daughter of Reverend Cyril  Frederick Parry Burnett. Adeane was educated at Eton College and then the Sorbonne in Paris, before being granted a National Service commission as a 2nd Lieutenant (No.400197) into the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry on 5th February 1949. Promoted to Lieutenant, he then saw service in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency in the early 1950’s, and then transferred to the 16th Battalion, Parachute Regiment for a further two years service. On leaving the army he decided to become a journalist, and worked on the editorial staff of The Daily Telegraph for three years and later worked for Beaverbrook Newspapers. Adeane married on 23rd January 1957, Denise Vivien, daughter of Thomas N. Cole of London and New York, the couple went on to have three children between 1957 and 1961, and they lived as a family on the Babraham Estate. In January 1961 Adeane was adopted as the prospective Conservative Parliamentary candidate for Erith and Crayford. Charles entered wholeheartedly into the political fray, believing passionately in justice and tolerance. Sadly Adeane’s promising career was cut short a month before his thirty-fourth birthday when he board the British Eagle International Airlines Flight 802 at London Heathrow on 29th February 1964, bound for Innsbruck Kranebitten Airport in Austria. On board were 75 passengers and 8 crew. Flight 802 was an international scheduled passenger flight which took off from London Heathrow Airport at 12:04 p.m. bound for Innsbruck. The aircraft was a Bristol Britannia. At approximately 1:35 p.m., the flight crew contacted Munich Air Traffic control. Nine minutes later the pilot of Flight 802 changed flight plans from Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) to Visual Flight Rules (VFR). Innsbruck had no instrument approach procedures and Flight described it as generally regarded as one of the most difficult airports in Europe . As they passed over Innsbruck VHF omnidirectional range station, the aircraft was still unable to break through the clouds. Snow flurries were falling. At 2:12 p.m., the crew of Flight 802 reported that were at 10,000 ft (3,000 m). This was the last communication received from the aircraft. Several minutes later, Flight 802 flew into the eastern slope of Glungezer Mountain at a height of approximately 8,500 ft (2,600 m). Everyone on board the aircraft, most of whom were Britons on a ski holiday, were killed in the crash.

An avalanche caused crash debris to move approximately 400 metres downhill. Due to the weather and light, the crash site was not found by aircraft until the day after. The recovery of the bodies and wreckage was hampered by the location which was accessible only by helicopter.

The British government made a protest when the Austrian authorities made a preliminary statement three days after the incident before the enquiry had barely started and the BALPA journal criticised a statement from the airport that their equipment was working and not the cause of the accident.

The crash of British Eagle International Airlines Flight 802 is the worst aviation disaster in Austrian history. It was concluded that the pilot of Flight 802 had intentionally descended below the minimum safe altitude of 11,000 ft (3,400 m) in an attempt to penetrate the overcast. Just before the crash, the crew was flying without visual contact of the ground in violation of Austrian regulations concerning Innsbruck Kranebitten Airport. Despite the weather, other aircraft were operating in and out of Kranebitten Airport and this may have been a factor in why 802's pilot decided to continue the descent.