​ The interesting family grouping to two brothers, one, Private J.M. Mein, 19th Hussars, who was present on operations along the Nile during the Gordon Relief Expedition and was present in action at the battle of Abu Klea on 17th January 1885, before deserting from the Army Reserve in 1895, being officially listed as a deserter in April 1896, and having moved to South Africa, then saw service during the Boer War with both the 2nd Imperial Light Horse and the Special Contingent of the Cape Police on operations, before moving to Rhodesia where h

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Product ID: CMA/22804
Condition: some contact pitting to first from Star, overall Very Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

The interesting family grouping to two brothers, one, Private J.M. Mein, 19th Hussars, who was present on operations along the Nile during the Gordon Relief Expedition and was present in action at the battle of Abu Klea on 17th January 1885, before deserting from the Army Reserve in 1895, being officially listed as a deserter in April 1896, and having moved to South Africa, then saw service during the Boer War with both the 2nd Imperial Light Horse and the Special Contingent of the Cape Police on operations, before moving to Rhodesia where he became a Mason with the Manica Lodge in Umtali, and worked for all of his civil life as a photographer, was then mortally wounded as a Rifleman with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps out on the Western Front, dying from his wounds on 9th October 1918. The other brother meanwhile, Staff Armourer Sergeant W. Mein, was serving with the Armourer Section of the Army Ordnance Corps, was awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in that rare Warrant Officer rank, he having also seen 17 years service out in India, and originally been a gunsmith from Edinburgh.
Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-1889, reverse dated 1882, 2 Clasps: The Nile 1884-85, Abu Klea; (2097. PTE: J.M. MEIN, 19TH: HUSSARS.); Khedive’s Star dated 1882.
Condition: some contact pitting to first from Star, overall Very Fine.

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, Victoria small letter reverse, engraved naming; (526. S.AR. SJT. W. MEIN. A.O.C.)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

John Moffat Mein was born on 17th December 1862 in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of Henry and Jane Men, he enlisted into the British Army at Edinburgh on 7th January 1881, joining as a Private (No.2097) the 19th Hussars. Sent with his regiment to Egypt, Mein was then present on operations along the Nile during the Gordon Relief Expedition during 1884 and into early 1885, and was present in action at the battle of Abu Klea on 17th January 1885.
Having then returned with his regiment to the United Kingdom, Mein was transferred to the Army Reserve, and having gone to work as a photographer, he married in October 1893 in Edmonton, Middlesex. On 1st October 1895 he was found to be absent without leave from his reserve duties whilst stationed at Bilymerign, and was subsequently listed as a deserter, his name and details being published in The Police Gazette on 21st April 1896.

Mein had in fact left England, and travelled to South Africa, and then settled in the Cape Colony. With the outbreak of the Boer War, he enlisted as a Trooper (No.92) into the 2nd Imperial Light Horse, a local South African unit, and was then present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal, and also saw service with the Special Contingent of the Cape Police as a Private (No.92).
Mein then later moved to Rhodesia, where he continued to work as a photographer and joined the Masons with the Manica Lodge in Umtali on 18th October 1906, but then resigned from the Lodge in 1908. Having then returned to South Africa and then gone back to Rhodesia, with the outbreak of the Great War, Mein travelled to England and enlisted as a Rifleman (No.57702) into the King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Sheerness, and then saw service on the Western Front from circa 1916 onwards, before dying of wounds on 9th October 1918 whilst being treated at No.3 Stabilization Hospital at Rouen, and being buried in St Sever Extension Cemetery at Rouen. Aged 55 at the time of his death, was is remarkable, that he died as a result of wounds received in combat, being by then a veteran of three wars, and he may well be the only man to have been present in action at Abu Klea back in January 1885, to then be killed during the Great War.

His brother, William Mein, was also born in Edinburgh, and having worked as a gunsmith, then saw service with the British Army for 24 years, eventually attaining the rank of Staff Armourer Sergeant subsequently Sergeant Major (No.526) with the Armourer Section of the Army Ordnance Corps, having been awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in the rare Warrant Officer rank of Staff Armourer Sergeant. Men was eventually discharged on 4th October 1906, having been a Warrant Officer for five years of his service, and having spent 17 years and 10 months out in India.         


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