The interesting Canadian Great War Ypres Salient 25th May 1916 Military Medal group awarded to Private A. Norton, 14th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the Royal Montreal Regiment, a clerk from Quebec City, Quebec, who was part of the original contingent who saw service out on the Western Front from 15th February 1915, and then showed persistent devotion to duty at all times since the regiment’s arrival up to May 1916, having several times carried up ammunition under heavy fire, and his conduct under fire in the Ypres Salient was splendid especial

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Product ID: CMA/25854
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The interesting Canadian Great War Ypres Salient 25th May 1916 Military Medal group awarded to Private A. Norton, 14th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the Royal Montreal Regiment, a clerk from Quebec City, Quebec, who was part of the original contingent who saw service out on the Western Front from 15th February 1915, and then showed persistent devotion to duty at all times since the regiment’s arrival up to May 1916, having several times carried up ammunition under heavy fire, and his conduct under fire in the Ypres Salient was splendid especially on 25th May 1916, in tending wounded under shell fire, this being the occasion when at 1 pm the Battalion Headquarters was shelled with 6.9 inch high explosive shells, and the medical officers Dug Out and Dressing Station was blown in, with four others ranks being wounded. Norton was subsequently employed as a batman on a number of occasions.

Group of 4: Military Medal, GVR bust; (25763 PTE A. NORTON. 14/CAN: I.BN.); 1914-1915 Star; (25763 PTE A. NORTON. 14/CAN:INF:); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (25763 L.CPL. A. NORTON. 14-CAN.INF.)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Alfred Norton was born on 21st August 1888 in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, and having worked as a clerk and seen service with the Canadian Militia for three years with the Royal Rifles of Quebec, followed by two years with the Queens Own Canadian Highlanders, then attested for service with the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Valcartier on 21st September 1914, joining as a Private (No.25763) with the 14th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the Royal Montreal Regiment. Arriving out on the Western Front on 15th February 1915 as part of the First Canadian Contingent, he received an injury to his knee on 30th March 1915, and eventually rejoined his unit on 10th May 1915.

Appointed to Lance Corporal on 14th August 1915, he came down with pleurisy and received treatment from 13th November 1915 through to 27th November 1915 when he rejoined the unit. Norton who distinguished himself in the Ypres Salient when tending wounded under shell fire on 25th May 1916 was then attached to the 3rd Canadian Infantry Brigade as batman to Major Gorman on 6th July 1916, but returned to duty with his battalion on 10th August 1916, and was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 11th October 1916.

The citation reads as follows: ‘For persistent devotion to duty at all times since the Regiment arrived in France. This man has shown good ability and has several times carried up ammunition under heavy fire. His conduct under fire in the Ypres Salient has been splendid especially on May 25th 1916, in tending wounded under shell fire.’

On the 25th May 1916 his battalion war diary records that at 1 pm the Battalion Headquarters was shelled with 6.9 inch high explosive shells, and that the medical officers Dug Out and Dressing Station was blown in, with four others ranks being wounded. It was presumably for his actions in the aftermath of this incident whilst the shelling was still ongoing that Norton did that final act of bravery which led to his award.

As mentioned, Norton rejoined his battalion from duties as a batman to Major Gorman on 10th August 1916, and was then once again appointed batman with the 3rd Brigade from 24th February to 9th March 1917, and was then sent to the base as a batman on 28th March 1917, and saw service with a training school at Havre till rejoining his battalion on 21st September 1917. Sent to another training camp at Etaples as a batman on 26th September 1917, he was posted to the Canadian Corps Gas School on 6th January 1918 but then rejoined his unit on 10th January 1918. Posted to England on 14th March 1919, he returned to Canada on 10th April 1919 and was discharged on 30th April 1919.