The interesting and rare East and Central Africa Medal 1897-1899, 2 Clasps: Lubwa’s, Uganda 1897-98, officially engraved naming, awarded to Mr R.R. Racey, Uganda Protectorate Administration, a Canadian from Quebec City, who was a 3rd Class Assista...

£2,250.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/30971
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
Description:

The interesting and rare East and Central Africa Medal 1897-1899, 2 Clasps: Lubwa’s, Uganda 1897-98, officially engraved naming, awarded to Mr R.R. Racey, Uganda Protectorate Administration, a Canadian from Quebec City, who was a 3rd Class Assistant Collector at Mumia’s on the outbreak of the troubles in Uganda in July 1897 when appointed a Storekeeper at Kampala. Racey then took part in operations in the Uganda Protectorate during the period from 20th July 1897 through to 19th March 1898, and having departed from Kampala for Lubwa’s on 22nd October 1897, then also found himself present during the suppression of the Uganda Mutiny in the period from 23rd September 1897 through to 24th February 1898. Racey was later promoted to 2nd Class Assistant Collector to the Uganda Protectorate in April 1900, and was the Assistant Collector at Ankole when he got into an argument with a Lieutenant G.C.R. Mundy, whom he then punched and knocked down on . Racey on 2nd August 1901. Racey was ultimately appointed a 3rd Class Assistant Collector with the British Central Africa Protectorate in June 1902.

East and Central Africa Medal 1897-1899, 2 Clasps: Lubwa’s, Uganda 1897-98, officially engraved naming; (MR. R.R. RACEY.)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Robert Ritchie Racey was born on 3rd April 1873 in Quebec City, Canada, and then joined the Colonial Civil Service, when appointed a 3rd Class Assistant Collector with the Uganda Protectorate on 27th July 1896. Racey arrived a Zanzibar from England on 8th September 1896 and then departed for Mombassa on 12th September 1896, and then departed for Uganda, arriving at Mumia’s on 24th November 1896.

With the outbreak of the troubles in Uganda, Racey found himself appointed as a Storekeeper at Kampala in July 1897, and then took part in operations in the Uganda Protectorate during the period from 20th July 1897 through to 19th March 1898, and having departed from Kampala for Lubwa’s on 22nd October 1897, then also found himself present during the suppression of the Uganda Mutiny in the period from 23rd September 1897 through to 24th February 1898. The mutiny occurred when disaffected Sudanese troops refused to go on an exploratory mission. They marched to Fort Lubwa’s on Lake Victoria and were joined by the garrison and by members of the Buganda tribe bringing their numbers to approximately 800.

Major General J.R.L. McDonald, Royal Engineers, with a scratch force of 340 Swahilis and a few Europeans, including Racey, and some Sikhs, arrived at the fort on 18th October. His ill-trained force was attacked but it managed to drive off the mutineers after a prolonged fight. The mutineers eventually evacuated Lubwa’s and cross the Nile. Pursued by McDonald who had received reinforcements, the rebels were defeated at Kijembo, Kabagambi, and Masindi.

Racey was one of a small number of civilians of the Uganda Protectorate Administration who gained entitlement to the additional Lubwa’s clasp to the East and Central Africa Medal 1897-1899, with clasp Uganda 1897-98 which he had earned earlier in the year.
Racey was posted from Kampala back to England on 11th May 1899, having been sent on leave back to Canada, and he then returned to England from Montreal on 8th November 1899, and resigned his appointed with the Uganda Protectorate Administration on 4th January 1900.

Racey was however then re-appointed as a 2nd Class Assistant Collector to the Uganda Protectorate on 2nd April 1900, and departed London for East Africa on 9th April 1900, arriving at Zanzibar on 27th April 1900, before departing Mombassa for Uganda on 2nd May 1900, arriving at Mbarara on 14th June 1900. Racey was then appointed the Assistant Collector at Ankole on 21st August 1900. Just less than one year later, Racey was suspended from duty on 2nd August 1901 and sent to Entebbe, the suspension having occurred after Racey had got into an argument with a Lieutenant G.C.R. Mundy, whom he then punched and knocked down. Racey arrived at Mombassa from Uganda on 22nd September 1901, and then departed Mombasa for Europe on 25th Septemer 1901. Racey was then forced to resign on 28th October 1891.

However he was then appointed a 3rd Class Assistant Collector with the British Central Africa Protectorate on 19th June 1902. He was subsequently forced to resign again having been found ‘subject to epileptic fits and wholly unsuited to work in a tropical climate.’ Racey, who was the author of the book ‘The Gizeh Sphinx and Middle Egyptian Pyramids’ in 1937, died in Paris, Ontario, Canada in September 1956.

11/24/20 - 04:06:05