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The fascinating and important India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia, awarded to Captain later General C.R.W. Hervey, 2nd Bombay European Regiment Light Infantry, Honourable East India Company Forces, later Bombay Staff Corps, Indian Army,

£1,500.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/28437
Condition: light contact wear, Good Very Fine or better.
Description:

The fascinating and important India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia, awarded to Captain later General C.R.W. Hervey, 2nd Bombay European Regiment Light Infantry, Honourable East India Company Forces, later Bombay Staff Corps, Indian Army, who was originally present during the expedition to Mangalore and Canara in 1837, and then saw service with the Sind Irregular Horse as 2nd-in-command and for sometime in command of that corps and of a Balooch Levy in Upper Sind in 1840 to 1842, and was with a wing of his regiment in Cutch and in command of His Highness the Rao’s Horse in the Runn in 1843 to 1844. It was however in Persia in 1857 that Hervey came particularly to notice for his work as the Acting Aide de Camp to Sir James Outram, one of four men to be employed on the Personal Staff of Outram during the campaign when he was in command of the forces. Hervey was present during the march to Borazjoon, the action at Kooshab, and the operations at Mohumra, being awarded the Brevet of Major, and appointed a Companion of the Civil Division of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath. Later present during the Indian Mutiny in 1858 including the relief of Kolapore, he was promoted to Major General in October 1877, and to Lieutenant General in July 1881, before becoming a full General on the Retired List in January 1889. He was the author of the book ’Some Records of Crime. Being the diary of a year, official and particular, of an officer of the Thuggee and Dacoitie Police’ and of ‘A Memoir and a Retrospect of Lieutenant General Crommelin, C.B., Royal (Bengal) Engineers - Forcing the Ganges at Cawnpore and march upon Lucknow - Underground Warfare at the Second Defence of the Residency: in the year of the Mutiny in India.’

India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia; (CAPT. C.R.W. HERVEY, 2ND. BOMBAY EUR. REGT. L.I.), mounted swing style as worn on original ribbon, fitted with a three-prong silver mounting brooch.

Condition: light contact wear, Good Very Fine or better.

Charles Robert West Hervey was born on 8th February 1818 in Kaira, Bombay, India, the son of Hervey Augustus Frederick Hervey, and Margarita Adriane Giessler, and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant into the Honourable East India Company Forces on 11th December 1835, and was posted out to India for service with the 23rd Bombay Native Infantry. Present during the expedition to Mangalore and Canara in 1837, he was promoted to Lieutenant on 12th November 1839.

He then saw service with the Sind Irregular Horse as 2nd-in-command and for sometime in command of that corps and of a Balooch Levy in Upper Sind in 1840 to 1842, and was with a wing of his regiment in Cutch and in command of His Highness the Rao’s Horse in the Runn in 1843 to 1844. Promoted to Captain on 2nd November 1846, he then saw an important role during the campaign in Persia in 1857.

The short lived war in Persia was caused by various political miscalculations by both the Persians and the British, and was triggered by the annexation of the Afghanistan city of Herat by the Persians on 25th October 1856, a city that was considered to be the key to Afghanistan. The British declared war on 1st November 1856 and instead of an expected land based invasion, the British decided to retaliate both on land and at sea. On 9th December, the fort at Reshire was captured at the expense of 11 killed in action and 29 wounded. The first Victoria Cross to the Indian Army was awarded for this action.

On the 10th, an Indian Naval Squadron commanded by Commodore Young bombarded Bushire in the Persian Gulf, which surrendered. On the arrival of Major General Sir James Outram with an expeditionary force, and advance was made inland from Bushire to Borasjoon, where many stores were captured on 8th February 1857. On the same day, during their immediate withdrawal, the force was attacked at Koosh-ab and the Persians were heavily defeated. British casualties were 16 killed in action and 56 wounded with two Victoria Crosses being awarded, both to the officers of the 3rd Bombay Light Cavalry. After his return to Bushire, Outram left Major General Stalker to hold the town, whilst he crossed the Persian Gulf and advanced up the Euphrates delta to Mohammerrah, some 60 miles inland. Here on 26th March 1857, the Navy bombarded the Persian positions and forts. Naval casualties were 5 killed in action and 18 wounded. After a short while the enemy positions were either silenced or completely destroyed, and troops were landed under Brigadier General Havelock, who promptly entered the city, captured a further large supply of stores. He very generously gave full credit for the ease with which he accomplished his mission to the navy, who in turn owed its immunity from heavy casualties to the foresight of the Acting Commodore James Rennie, who gave orders for the bombarding ships to be surrounded with trusses of hay!

The Persians withdrew to Akwaz, about 100 miles up the Karoon River, where they were again attacked by a combined expedition, the navy under Acting Commodore Rennie and a small force composed of about 300 men from the 64th and 78th Foot under Captain G.H. Hunt, 78th Foot. The town was captured with no British casualties on 1st April 1857, after which the force returned to Mohammerrah, where it learnt that peace had been signed in Paris on 4th March, under the terms of which Herat was to be evacuated by the Persians.

During the campaign, Hervey saw service as the Acting Aide de Camp to Sir James Outram, one of four men to be employed on the Personal Staff of Outram during the campaign. As such Hervey is confirmed as having been present during the march to Borazjoon, the action at Kooshab, and the operations at Mohumra, being awarded the Brevet of Major, the medal with clasp for Persia, and appointed a Companion of the Civil Division of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath.

Hervey then returned to India, and was then present during the Indian Mutiny in 1858, including the relief of Kolapore, for which he received the medal without clasp. Hervey had been promoted to Major on 19th January 1858, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 11th December 1861. Hervey then transferred into the Indian Army on its formation, and saw service with the Bombay Staff Corps, being promoted to Colonel on 11th December 1866. Promoted to Major General on 2nd October 1877, he was promoted to Lieutenant General on 1st July 1881 and placed on the Retired List on the same day, being then promoted to General on the Retired List on 22nd January 1889. Having returned to England, he latterly lived in Newton Abbott, Devon, where he died on 23rd June 1903. Hervey was the author of the book ’Some Records of Crime. Being the diary of a year, official and particular, of an officer of the Thuggee and Dacoitie Police’, published 1892, and had in 1887 also ‘A Memoir and a Retrospect of Lieutenant General Crommelin, C.B., Royal (Bengal) Engineers - Forcing the Ganges at Cawnpore and march upon Lucknow - Underground Warfare at the Second Defence of the Residency: in the year of the Mutiny in India.’