The extremely rare and superb Irish Troubles 1921 Troop Train Rebel Derailment Adavoyle 24th June 1921 Military Division of the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Boer War and 1914 Old Contemptible's long service group awarded to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Squadron Sergeant Major G. Farrant, 10th The Prince of Wales Own Royal Hussars, who rescued kicking and maddened horses from the broken, smashed and derailed train trucks.

Price: £3,950.00


Product ID: CMA/8498
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

The extremely rare and superb Irish Troubles 1921 Troop Train Rebel Derailment Adavoyle 24th June 1921 Military Division of the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Boer War and 1914 Old Contemptible's long service group awarded to Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Squadron Sergeant Major G. Farrant, 10th The Prince of Wales Own Royal Hussars, who rescued kicking and maddened horses from the broken, smashed and derailed train trucks.

Group of 6: Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Military Division, unnamed as issued; Queen's South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 5 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902; (4551 PTE G. FARRANT, 10TH RL: HUSSARS); 1914 Star with Clasp; (4551 SJT G. FARRANT. 10/HRS.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (4551 W.O.CL.2 G. FARRANT. 10-HRS.); Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, GVR Fm. bust; (H-47024 SD: S. MJR: G. FARRANT. 10/HRS:), mounted court style for display. Condition: Good Very Fine.

George Farrant joined the British Army sometime prior to the Boer War, and then saw service in South Africa as a Private (No.4551) with the 10th The Prince of Wales Own Royal Hussars, and was present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal, from circa 1900 to 1902. Farrant was still serving with his regiment at the time of the outbreak of the Great War, by which time he held the rank of Sergeant, and as such saw service in France with the British Expeditionary Force from 6th October 1914, and was later wounded in action on 8th August 1918 during the attack and capture of the line of the Amiens outer defences which began that day, by which time he held the rank of Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Squadron Sergeant Major (No.H-47024), and he was also awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order No.305 of October 1918. In 1920 the 10th Royal Hussars were stationed in Ireland and by the end of the year they were stationed at Hare Park, Curragh and serving as a Squadron Sergeant Major (No.534200) embroiled in the Irish struggle for independence. It is was during this period that Farrant perform the following deeds. 'At Adavoyle on 24th June 1921, on the occasion of the derailing of a troop train conveying a party of the 10th Hussars with horses by rebels, this Warrant Officer showed the greatest disregard for personal safety whilst engaged in the rescue of horses from the broken trucks. This Warrant Officer repeatedly entered the trucks containing the kicking and maddened horses and effected their release.' For his bravery on this occasion, Farrant was awarded the Military Division Medal of the Order of the British Empire, a rare award for the Irish troubles, with the award being published in the London Gazette for 28th September 1921, with the award being presented to him at an investiture held at the Royal Hospital of Kilmainham on Saturday 14th January 1922. Nine awards of the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Military Division were presented on this occasion, all for services in Ireland during the troubles, and one other man was awarded the medal for the incident when Farrant earned his award, this being Farrier Staff Sergeant Thomas Edwin Cox, 10th Hussars, and they were the only two recipients of this rare medal within the regiment.