​ The exceptional Second World War Battle of Imphal 29th March 1944 Advance along the Imphal-Tiddim Road Milestone 101 ‘immediate’ Military Medal group awarded to Sergeant T. Hudson, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, who after an enemy position had been taken and then counterattacked by the Japanese, witnessed a wounded a man in an Observation Post about 50 yards outside the perimeter, went forward with an officer and others to rescue him, on one of the rescue party being wounded, he brought him back, and then went to rescue another woun

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The exceptional Second World War Battle of Imphal 29th March 1944 Advance along the Imphal-Tiddim Road Milestone 101 ‘immediate’ Military Medal group awarded to Sergeant T. Hudson, 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, who after an enemy position had been taken and then counterattacked by the Japanese, witnessed a wounded a man in an Observation Post about 50 yards outside the perimeter, went forward with an officer and others to rescue him, on one of the rescue party being wounded, he brought him back, and then went to rescue another wounded man, going out four times under enemy fire and guiding new rescue parties and directing their fire each time, the action lasted for two hours, and Hudson was continually out attempting to bring the wounded within the perimeter, before finally playing a prominent part in the final successful rescue of the wounded man from the Observation Post who had originally been the object of the initial rescue attempt.

Group of 5: Military Medal, GVI 1st type bust; (4543888 SJT. T. HUDSON. W.YORK.R.); 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; Defence Medal; War Medal. Mounted swing style for wear.
Condition: Good Very Fine.
Provenance: Ex Major Flatlow Collection.
Tom Hudson came from Bradford, Yorkshire, and saw service during the Second World War as a Sergeant (No.4543888) with the 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment out in India and Burma. It was during the fighting in Burma that the 1st Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment distinguished itself in being one of only four regiments to win the Battle Honour ‘Burma 1942-1945’ for having been there fighting the Japanese from the beginning right through the end.
When the German War commenced in 1939, the 1st West Yorkshire’s were in India performing the normal Imperial garrison duties, but 1st West Yorks were then moved by sea to Rangoon immediately following the outbreak of the Japanese War. Joining battle at Pegu, the battalion was constantly involved in heavy fighting throughout the terrible retreat from Burma, but gained a formidable reputation which was to remain for the rest of the war. They returned to the Assam front in 1943, and were severely tested the following year in the desperate battles around Imphal.

It was during the fighting for Milestone 101 on the Imphal-Tiddim Road on 29th March 1944 in the battle for Imphal when his battalion was serving as part of the 17th Indian Light Division during the 200 mile hard fought advance along the Tiddim Road in wild and mountainous country during the height of the monsoon that Hudson performed the act of gallantry which led to an ‘immediate’ award of the Military Medal, the recommendation being made originally on 5th April 1944.

The recommendation reads as follows: ‘On 29 March 44 in area Mile 101 Rd. Imphal - Tiddim after an enemy position had been taken by our troops the Japanese immediately counter-attacked and wounded a man in an Observation Post about 50 yards outside the perimeter. This NCO with Lieut. Neville went out to bring the man in. Immediately this party with one other man came under fire and the man was wounded. Sgt. Hudson brought this man back. In attempts to reach the wounded man Sgt. Hudson went out four times under enemy fire guiding new rescue parties and directing their fire each time. The action lasted for two hours. During these two hours Sgt. Hudson was an example of both coolness and bravery allowing no thought for himself to deter him from his attempts to bring the wounded within the perimeter. He played a prominent part in the final successful rescue and it was largely due to his tenacity of purpose under fire that the wounded were finally brought in. This NCO’s conduct throughout was of the highest order.’   

Hudson’s ‘immediate’ award of the Military Medal was published in the London Gazette for 22nd June 1944, his being one of forty-four awards to the West Yorkshire Regiment for Burma. The regiment fielded three battalions during the campaign, and two Victoria Crosses were won by men of the 1st Battalion during the bitter fighting in Burma.


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