The exceptional Malayan Emergency Military Medal, Second World War Burma, and post war South East Asia and Indian Independence 1947 group awarded to Lance Corporal Budhiraj Limbu, 1st Battalion, 10th Princess Mary’s Own Gurkha Rifles, who on 29th June 1952 when engaged with 30 enemy terrorists, accounted for four of them personally, three of whom in a matter of seconds, and was mostly responsible for the defeat of the enemy, despite being at the time sick with fever.

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Product ID: CMA/17414
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Description:

The exceptional Malayan Emergency Military Medal, Second World War Burma, and post war South East Asia and Indian Independence 1947 group awarded to Lance Corporal Budhiraj Limbu, 1st Battalion, 10th Princess Mary’s Own Gurkha Rifles, who on 29th June 1952 when engaged with 30 enemy terrorists, accounted for four of them personally, three of whom in a matter of seconds, and was mostly responsible for the defeat of the enemy, despite being at the time sick with fever.

Group of 5: Military Medal, EIIR Br.Omn. bust; (2114132 A/L/CPL. BUDHIRAJ LIMBU. 10 G.R.); Burma Star; War Medal; General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 2nd type bust, 2 Clasps: S.E. Asia 1945-46, Malaya; (11668 RFN. BUDHIRAJ LIMBU. 3/10 G.R.); India: Indian Independence Medal 1947; (21140132 RFN. BUDHIRAJ. LIMBU. G.R.)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Budhiraj Limbu was born in 1924, and then saw service during the Second World War with the Indian Army from 26th April 1943, and served towards the very end of the campaign in Burma as a Rifleman (No.2114132) with the 3rd Battalion, 10th Gurkha Rifles, and then saw service during the post war troubles in South East Asia which lasted from 3rd September 1945 to 30th November 1946, and was serving with his battalion on the occasion of the Indian Independence on 15th August 1947.

As a consequence of the Tripartite Agreement between India, Nepal and the UK, four of the 10 Gurkha regiments (eight Battalions in all), were transferred to the British Army; the 10th Gurkha Rifles being one of them. It joined the Brigade of Gurkhas which was formed to administer the Gurkha units transferred to the British Army. Before independence, the battalion decided to take the old colours of the 10th Madras Infantry out of India with it. Consideration was given to taking the regimental memorial at All-Saints Church in Maymyo Burma, which had been damaged by the Japanese during the war, but it was decided to leave it behind because of the expense involved and the uncertainty over where it could be relocated. It consisted of marble on the floor of the sanctuary and wooden plaques on the walls.

In 1949 the regiment's name was altered to become the 10th Princess Mary's Own Gurkha Rifles in honour of HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal. The regiment was affiliated with the Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment), the oldest regiment in the regular army in 1950.

The 10th Gurkha Rifles took part in the Malayan Emergency against Communist insurgents. The insurgents had launched an uprising in 1948 in support of their perception that Malayan independence did not directly lead to the installation of a Communist government. The 10th Gurkhas were involved in the Emergency from the beginning, the conflict was similar to the Burma campaign. The regiment remained involved until the official conclusion of the Emergency in 1960. The regiment lost 75 men during the conflict.

Budhiraj Limbu was present on operations in Malaya from 2nd April 1948 to 25th August 1952, and then again from 24th April 1953 to 21st October 1954, again from 29th May 1957 to 31st May 1957, and after a period in Hong Kong, was finally present on operations in Malaya from 6th March 1958 to 4th January 1961.

It was for his continuous gallantry in action with B Company of the 1st Battalion, 10th Gurkha Rifles in Malaya during the period from June 1948 to November 1954, when he was almost continuously on operations and specifically for his gallantry in an ambush on 29th June 1952 when engaged against 30 enemy, he personally accounted for four terrorists killed, three of whom were killed in a matter of seconds, that Budhiraj Limbu was awarded the Military Medal in the London Gazette for 31st May 1955.

The lengthy recommendation reads as follows:

‘Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu of ‘B’ Company, apart from one period of leave in Nepal has been engaged constantly on Anti-Communist terrorist operations throughout the period covered by this citation. During this time he has consistently maintained an extremely high standard of tenacity, endurance and courage, having taken part in many minor actions against the terrorists. In the later half of 1952 his company was engaged in operations in the Trengganu area of Malaya directed against the terrorist organisation controlled by H.Q. 7th Regiment, Malayan National Liberation Army. By the end of June several small actions had been fought but the main body of the terrorists had not been contacted. On 29 June Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu, sick with fever and with an injured foot was appointed leader of a party of six sick men, with orders to make his way through the jungle to a clearing held by another platoon of his company, for evacuation by helicopter to base for medical treatment. No fit men could be spared as escort to this party of sick men. Moving slowly and with some difficulty the party had covered half the distance to the clearing when they heard the noise of sticks being cut. Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu realised that they were approaching a terrorist camp. Moving forward with great caution they came in sight of the camp and saw that it was occupied by about 35 armed and uniformed terrorists. Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu detailed the three weakest soldiers to remain in observation at the point of discovery and worked out his plan. He led the two remaining soldiers in an encircling movement round the camp successfully evading the terrorist sentries. He positioned his two men on the far side of the camp and moved further on where he took up his position alone. The first three soldiers now moved forward into the camp and opened fire on the terrorists. One terrorist was killed immediately, but the others although completely surprised, formed up in an effort to fight back. They were then fired on by Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu’s cut off party and another terrorist was killed. The terrorists now made a determined effort to escape and rushed in a body towards the spot where Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu stood alone. Although over thirty armed men were moving towards him Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu stood his ground. In a matter of seconds he shot and killed three terrorists. In the thick jungle the terrorists now split up in some confusion and Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu while engaging those he could see to the front, was charged from the rear by one of them. This terrorist discharged both barrels of his shotgun at Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu from behind but unaccountably missed. Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu turned and shot down this man also. By now this spirited action was over; the terrorists intent only on getting away, fled, leaving considerable stocks of rice and clothing.

Although this is the story of a success achieved by six sick but resolute and determined men, there is no doubt that their actions were inspired by the personal leadership and bravery of Rifleman Budhiraj Limbu who come what may, was determined to inflict casualties on his adversaries. A surrendered terrorist later confirmed that the terrorist camp attacked had been occupied by H.Q. 7th Regiment, Malayan National Liberation Army, which had hitherto remained undetected and fully confirmed the successes described above.’

Medal and clasp entitlement confirmed from the recipient’s service records which accompany the group.


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