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The exceptional December 1993 Rescue from Fire Queen’s Gallantry Medal awarded to Alan Lance Clark, a Private in the British Army, who in the early hours of the morning of Sunday, 12th December 1993 was off duty and walking with two friends lookin...

£3,850.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/30316
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
Description:

The exceptional December 1993 Rescue from Fire Queen’s Gallantry Medal awarded to Alan Lance Clark, a Private in the British Army, who in the early hours of the morning of Sunday, 12th December 1993 was off duty and walking with two friends looking for a lost dog when he performed the incredible act of gallantry in saving life and attempting to save further life from fire, a house fire having broken out and taken hold before the alarm could be raised. Foam furniture and other combustibles added to the hazard releasing highly toxic gases and reducing visibility almost to nothing, as with the assistance off his two friends, he singly entered the property after climbing onto the porch roof which gave access to an upstairs window. Without any thought for his own safety, and though unfamiliar with the layout of the house, he climbed into the burning building he felt his way along the walls, located one child by touch and dragged her to the safety of the window, and despite by then struggling to breath, returned into the dense smoke to search blindly for the remaining children. By then suffering from the severe effects of smoke inhalation, by chance he located the second child and carried her to safety, but owing to the flames beginning to advance up the stairwell and seriously impeding access to the remaining child, it became impossible to re-enter the house and rescue the third child.

Queen’s Gallantry Medal; (ALAN LANCE CLARK), housed its Royal Mint fitted presentation case.

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Alan Lance Clark was a serving Private in the British Army, though his regiment is unfortunately not presently known, when he performed the act of bravery in rescuing two out of three children trapped in a house fire in the early morning of 12th December 1993. The citation reads as follows:

‘In the early hours of the morning of Sunday, 12th December 1993, Private Clark was off duty, walking with two friends looking for a lost dog. Nearby a house fire had broken out and had taken good hold before the alarm was raised. The occupier had been forced to retreat from the house due to the heat and fumes leaving her three children trapped inside. Grey acrid smoke was billowing from the house choking anyone nearby. The fire had taken hold in a foam settee, smouldering for some time before bursting into flames releasing highly toxic gases and reducing visibility almost to nothing.

All three men ran to the house and climbed onto a porch roof which gave access to an upstairs window.Without any thought for his own safety, and though unfamiliar with the layout of the house, Private Clark climbed into the burning building. Feeling his way along the walls, he located one child by touch and dragged her to the safety of the window. He returned, struggling for breath, into the dense smoke to search blindly for the remaining children. He was by now suffering the severe effects of smoke inhalation. By chance he located the second child and carried her to safety. By now the flames were beginning to advance up the stairwell seriously impeding access to the remaining child and making it impossible to re-enter the house. Private Clark was subsequently taken to hospital where he received treatment for the effects of smoke inhalation suffered in the course of the rescue.

Private, Clark displayed gallantry of a high order when, without regard to his own safety, he rescued a child in low visibility and choking smoke from a burning house. Aware of the conditions, he unhesitatingly entered the house a second time and rescued a further child.’

Clark’s award of the Queen’s Gallantry Medal was published in the London Gazette for 1st July 1994, and by the time the award was announced, he had left the army.