The emotive Great War 1914 Battle of the Aisne Officer Casualty and First Class Cricketer Trio and Plaque group awarded to Lieutenant M.K. Mackenzie, 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, attached 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade, who having been educated at the famous cricketing school Horris Hill in Berkshire, went on to play cricket for Winchester College, Oxford University, and the Marylebone County Cricket Club at Lord’s, playing in three first-class matches whilst at Oxford in 1910, and for the MCC in 1914, he was killed in action during a

Price: £2,500.00


Product ID: CMA/25353
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

The emotive Great War 1914 Battle of the Aisne Officer Casualty and First Class Cricketer Trio and Plaque group awarded to Lieutenant M.K. Mackenzie, 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, attached 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade, who having been educated at the famous cricketing school Horris Hill in Berkshire, went on to play cricket for Winchester College, Oxford University, and the Marylebone County Cricket Club at Lord’s, playing in three first-class matches whilst at Oxford in 1910, and for the MCC in 1914, he was killed in action during a dawn attack on a line of German trenches near Soupin, north-east of Soissons on 25th September 1914, only one day after arriving on the Western Front, he being seen to fall badly wounded, he pulled himself to his feet, and continued to lead his platoon, in the face of withering fire from German machine-gun and infantry positions, being wounded a second time, when close to the enemy trenches, he still called out to his men and was heard to shout, ‘Forward, Come on, come on!’ He was never seen alive again. Mackenzie was also a keen hunter, hunting with the Duke of Buccleuch’s Hounds, and an outstanding golfer, being a member of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers.

Trio and Plaque: 1914 Star with Clasp; (LIEUT: M.K. MACKENZIE. K.R.RIF:C.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (LIEUT. M.K. MACKENZIE.); Memorial Plaque named to; (MARK KINCAID MACKENZIE)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Mark Kincaid Mackenzie was born on 22nd August 1888 in New Town, Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of the Honourable Charles Kincaid Mackenzie L.L.D., and Lady Mackenzie, nee Young, of Wester Shian, Gullane, East Lothian. Educated a Horris Hill School in Berkshire, and then Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford, whilst at Winchester he played for the Winchester Cricket XI in 1905, 1906 and 1907, and was a house prefect and second captain of the college cricket team at Lords in his last year. At Oxford he was a Harlequin.

In 1910 he played three first-class matches all for Oxford University, and his debut came again Kent on 12th May 1910 at The University Parks, Oxford. He scored 15 in his one innings, and took a wicket for 8 off 4 overs, Oxford won by 8 wickets. His second appearance was on 26th May 1910 against Surrey, once again at The University Parks, Oxford, when he scored 0 and 1, taking one wicket for 28 off 12 overs in the first innings, and one wicket for 21 off 6 overs in the second, Surrey won by 116 runs. Mackenzie’s final first class appearance was on 30th June 1910 against the Gentlemen of England at The Saffron’s, Eastbourne. He scored 48 not out and 1, taking one wicket for 36 off 13 overs during the first innings and 2 for 65 off 18 overs in the second. The Gentlemen of England won by 113 runs. In 1914 he played for Marylebone Cricket Club, as well as the Rifle Brigade.

Having opted for a career with the British Army, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant into the King’s Royal Rifle Corps in July 1911, and then joined the 4th Battalion out in India. With the outbreak of the Great War, Mackenzie was on home leave and then found himself seconded to the 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade.

Mackenzie saw service out on the Western Front from 24th September 1914, and only the next day, 25th September 1914, during the Battle of the Aisle, Mackenzie was involved in a dawn attack on a line of German trenches near Soupin, north-east of Soissons. During this attack he was seen to fall, badly wounded. Pulling himself to his feet he continued to lead his platoon in the attack. The fire was withering from German machine-gun and infantry positions and Mackenzie was wounded for a second time, this time close to the enemy trenches. Despite being mortally wounded, he still called out to his men and was heard to shout, ‘Forward, Come on, come on!’ He was never seen alive again. Mackenzie is buried in Montcornet Military Cemetery.

In addition to having played cricket for and been a member of the MCC and I Zingari, he was also a keen hunter, hunting with the Duke of Buccleuch’s Hounds. An outstanding golfer, he was also a member of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers.