South Africa Boer War and Great War 1914 First Battle of Ypres Casualty group awarded to Private G. Most, East Kent Regiment - the Buffs. Present during the Boer War with the 2nd Battalion between June 1900 and March 1902 and on operations in the ...

£625.00
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Product ID: CMA/32478
Condition: first two with light contact wear, overall Good Very Fine.
Description:

South Africa Boer War and Great War 1914 First Battle of Ypres Casualty group awarded to Private G. Most, East Kent Regiment - the Buffs. Present during the Boer War with the 2nd Battalion between June 1900 and March 1902 and on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal, he was recalled from the Army Reserve for the Great War, and then saw service with the 1st Battalion out on the Western Front from 7th September 1914. Suffering a gun shot wound to the face whilst in action at Radingem on 18th October 1914 during the First Battle of Ypres, he was evacuated home, but initially recovered, and then joined the 2nd Battalion at the front in March 1915. Complications from his old wound almost immediately set in, and he was mostly convalescing out in France till posted with his battalion to Egypt and then Salonica later in 1915. It was whilst on service in Salonica in January 1916 that the complications from his old injury flared up again, and he suffered from partial paralysis of the wrist, which was later diagnosed as suffering from spasmodic hysteria. He was invalided from service in April 1916.

Group of 5: Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 3 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal; (5916 PTE. G. MOAT, E. KENT REGT.); King’s South Africa Medal 1902-1902, 2 Clasps: South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902; (5916 PTE. G. MOAT. E. KENT REGT.); 1914 Star with original Clasp; (L-5916 PTE. D. MOAT. 1/E. KENT R.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (L-5916 PTE. G. MOAT. E. KENT R.)

Condition: first two with light contact wear, overall Good Very Fine.

Together with a fine studio photograph of the recipient in walking out uniform, wearing his first two awards, as taken by the photographer W.G. Wise of Bulford Camp, Wiltshire.

East Kent Regiment - The Buffs other ranks cap badge.

George Moat was born in 1881 in the parish of Ash, near Dover, Kent and having worked as a labourer, then enlisted into the British Army at Canterbury on 25th April 1899, joining as a Private (No.5916) with the East Kent Regiment - the Buffs. Most then saw service over in South Africa during the Boer War from 8th June 1900 with the 2nd Battalion, and was present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. Most was posted to India on 21st March 1902, and then home on 10th December 1904, and was latterly serving with the 1st Battalion when he was transferred to the Army Reserve in April 1907, and went to work as a postman.

Recalled from the Reserve on the outbreak of the Great War, Most then saw service with the 1st Battalion out on the Western Front with the British Expeditionary Force from 7th September 1914, and was then wounded in action with a gun shot wound to the face on 18th October 1914 whilst in action at Radingem in the Ypres sector. Evacuated to the 16th Field Ambulance, and then to the 2nd Auxiliary Hospital at Bailleul the following day, before being moved to the 7th Stationary Hospital at Boulogne on 21st October, he was evacuated to England on 10th November.

Despite having been shot in the face, Most recovered, and was then posted to the 2nd Battalion from the base details on 24th March 1915 and returned to the Western Front. Only a few days later however on 29th March he was admitted to hospital at Le Havre due to complications from his old wound, and was then sent the following day to a convalescent camp. Deemed to be once again fit on 2nd July 1915, he was posted to the 5th Entrenching Battalion on 5th August, but then rejoined the 2nd Battalion and embarked at Marseilles on 23rd October before disembarking in Alexandria on 31st October 1915.

Moat then saw service as a member of ‘A’ Company of the 2nd Battalion in Salonica, and it was whilst on service there that his old wound once again caught up with him, and he suffered from partial paralysis of the wrist, being admitted to the 86th Field Ambulance on 18th January 1916, and the moved to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital on 30th January, being then embarked aboard a hospital ship some five days later. Admitted to hospital at Malta on 7th February, he was diagnosed as suffering from spasmodic hysteria, and was invalided to England aboard another hospital ship on 28th March. Sent on leave on 11th April 1916, he was discharged medically unfit for further service on 24th April 1916 and awarded the Silver War Badge. Confirmed as his full entitlement.