Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, with ghost dates, 3 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, named in correct engraved style, awarded to Private O. Connolly, 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons, who was present in South Africa during the B...

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Product ID: CMA/31477
Condition: Good Very Fine.
Description:

Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, with ghost dates, 3 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, named in correct engraved style, awarded to Private O. Connolly, 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons, who was present in South Africa during the Boer War on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. It was whilst on service there that Connolly was tried by Field General Court Martial and convicted of stealing and of handling stolen goods which were the property of the Government, being imprisoned for one year with hard labour on 6th March 1901. It was whilst he was still serving his sentence that Connolly was shipped home in June 1901 and then returned to South Africa in November 1901, being returned to duty in March 1902. His is a most unusual case, and having missed out on entitlement to the King’s South Africa Medal with both date clasps, he is confirmed as additionally entitled to the South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902 clasps to his Queen’s South Africa Medal, which may well be a rare combination to his regiment.

Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, with ghost dates, 3 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, named in correct engraved style; (3558 PTE. O. CONNOLLY. 6/DRGNS:)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Owen Connolly was born in Liverpool, and having worked as a labourer and seen service for two months with the Highland Light Infantry prior to purchasing his discharge, then attested for service with the British Army at Liverpool on 5th February 1896, joining as a Private (No.3558) the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons at Edinburgh.

With the outbreak of the Boer War he was posted with his regiment to South Africa on 24th October 1899, and was then present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. It was whilst on service there that Connolly was placed in confinement on 25th February 1901, and then tried by Field General Court Martial and convicted of stealing and of handling stolen goods which were the property of the Government, being imprisoned for one year with hard labour on 6th March 1901.

Connolly was still in imprisonment when he was shipped home on 22nd June 1901, and was still in imprisonment when he was returned to South Africa on 28th November 1901, and was there when returned to duty on 6th March 1902. Connolly then served through to the end of the war, and was posted home on 29th October 1902, being transferred to the Army Reserve on 5th March 1903 and fully discharged on 4th February 1908. Owing to his imprisonment, Connolly missed out on entitlement to the King’s South Africa Medal, however he is confirmed as additionally entitled to the South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902 clasps to his Queen’s South Africa Medal, which may well be a rare combination to his regiment.