Malayan Emergency Kajang Selangor Province Section Commander’s 5th November 1950 Military Medal winner’s General Service Medal, with an accompanying erased Military Medal, awarded to Corporal and Local Sergeant later Sergeant J.M. Allan, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, who saw service with his battalion ibn Malaya during the period from October 1948 to 1951, and on 5th November 1950, when leading a small patrol investigating suspicious noises coming from an overgrown rubber plantation, he spotted the enemy before the rest of the patrol came up, an

Price: £950.00


Product ID: CMA/28355
Condition: first with naming erased, second with slight contact wear, only Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

Malayan Emergency Kajang Selangor Province Section Commander’s 5th November 1950 Military Medal winner’s General Service Medal, with an accompanying erased Military Medal, awarded to Corporal and Local Sergeant later Sergeant J.M. Allan, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, who saw service with his battalion ibn Malaya during the period from October 1948 to 1951, and on 5th November 1950, when leading a small patrol investigating suspicious noises coming from an overgrown rubber plantation, he spotted the enemy before the rest of the patrol came up, and in the process of signalling to the patrol of his discovery of the party of ten or twelve bandits, he was himself spotted and charged by the enemy, one of whom was armed with a Bren gun. Taking the initiative, he himself ran forward towards the enemy, and shortly afterwards they charged. Remaining completely cool throughout the action, constantly moving from tree to tree to gain better fire positions, and armed with a rifle which he used with great effect, he is known to have hit at least two of the enemy. One of these was about to shoot at the patrol commander at a range of some five yards, but was spotted by Allan who shot him in the mouth, thereby probably saving his commander. The success of the action was largely due to his bravery, steadiness and skill at arms. The known enemy casualties were three killed, one wounded and captured, and two wounded.

Military Medal, GVI 2nd type bust, naming erased; General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Malaya; (270536 SJT. J. ALLAN. M.M. S.G.), mounted swing style for wear.

Condition: first with naming erased, second with slight contact wear, only Fine.

John McNaught Allan saw service as a Corporal and Local Sergeant (No.2705366) with the 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, and with the outbreak of the Malayan Emergency, he deployed with his battalion to Malaya in October 1948 as part of the 2nd Guards Brigade, which in 1950 was retitled the 18th Infantry Brigade.

The State of Emergency in Malaya had been declared in June 1948 after increased violence and terrorist acts against British, Asian and other citizens were perpetrated by the Malayan Races Liberation Army, an organisation made up largely of ethnic Chinese Communists who opposed the creation of the Federation of Malaya as they believed it did not directly lead to the creation of a Communist state, and also opposed the British Empire. The Communist insurgents were originally known as 'Bandits' but this was soon replaced with the term CT for Communist Terrorist.

During its time in Malaya, the 2nd Battalion performed a variety of duties, including, in their involvement in the Emergency, guarding duties due to the Malayan Police’s manpower problems, but also performed more aggressive tasks, such as patrolling into the dense jungle, hunting for CT. The patrols were difficult for the Commonwealth forces, who did not know where the CT lurked, and who had to contend with all the many aspects of the jungle, such as the diverse animals and sounds that make the jungle their home (especially leeches), and the claustrophobia of such a place, with the soldiers having probably been accustomed to living in relatively wide-open cities. A very apparent danger was the deadly booby traps laid by the CT. Patrols at times, despite hard slogging in the energy-sapping jungle, gave very little to show for the hard-work, but when contact was made with the CT, it invariably ended in fierce, close-quarters combat, with much valour and professionalism often displayed by the battalion. In 1948, the Scots Guards were involved in the Batang Kali massacre. By the time the battalion departed Malaya in 1951 for home. it had lost thirteen officers and other ranks.

It was during a small patrol on the afternoon of 5th November 1950 whilst at Kajang in Selangor that Allan, at the time ranked as a Local Sergeant and serving as a Section Commander, won his Military Medal.

The recommendation reads as follows: ‘On the afternoon of 5th november 1950 Local Sergeant Allan was leading the men of a small patrol which was stalking some suspicious noises in an overgrown rubber plantation. On reaching the crest of a small hill he spotted a party of ten or twelve bandits and signalled his patrol to halt. Before the patrol could reach him the enemy saw him so he ran forward and opened fire. Shortly afterwards the enemy charged, firing as they came, their weapons included one Bren gun. Local Sergeant Allan remained completely cool throughout the action, constantly moving from tree to tree to gain better fire positions. He was armed with a rifle which he used with great effect and is known to have hit at least two of the enemy. One of these was about to shoot at the patrol commander at a range of some five yards: he was spotted by Local Sergeant Allan who shot him in the mouth, thereby probably saving his commander. The success of the action was largely due to his bravery, steadiness and skill at arms. The known enemy casualties were three killed, one wounded and captured, and two wounded.’

Allan’s award of the Military Medal was published in the London Gazette for 2nd January 1951, his award being the last of three awards of this decoration to the Scots Guards for service in the Malayan Emergency.