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Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-1859, 1 Clasp: Delhi, awarded to Ensign later Major W.G. Turle, 1st Battalion, 60th Rifles, who was present during the Indian Mutiny at the siege of Delhi, and in the actions on the Hindun, the battle of Badli-ke-Serai, be...

£1,600.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/30050
Condition: slight edge bruising, otherwise Nearly Extremely Fine
Description:

Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-1859, 1 Clasp: Delhi, awarded to Ensign later Major W.G. Turle, 1st Battalion, 60th Rifles, who was present during the Indian Mutiny at the siege of Delhi, and in the actions on the Hindun, the battle of Badli-ke-Serai, being then present for the storming and capture of the Heights before Delhi, and dangerously wounded in action there on 10th August 1857. As a fly-fisherman he has however left his mark, he being considered an expert in his day. His obituary in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle of 1909 stated: ‘His name will never be forgotten while trout fishing lasts, as the Turle knot for eyed-flies will perpetuate it. It was, we believe, the first attempt to fasten gut stiffly to an eyed-fly, and through other knots have been invented since, his is still extensively used, and in some cases is almost indispensable.’ The famous firm of Hardy & Co even gave his name to a fishing rod, it being known as the ‘Major Turle’s Pattern’.

Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-1859, 1 Clasp: Delhi; (ENSIGN H.G. TURLE, 1ST. BN. 60TH. RIFLES.)

Condition: slight edge bruising, otherwise Nearly Extremely Fine.

William Greer Turle, first initial shown as ‘H’ on the medal, was born on 25th March 1839 in Saint Leonard’s-on-Sea, Sussex, and was commissioned as an Ensign into the 60th Rifles on 1st February 1856. Posted to the 1st Battalion, he saw service out in India, and with the Indian Mutiny, was present in action at the actions on the Hindun, the battle of Badli-ke-Serai, and during during the siege of Delhi which lasted from 30th May to 14th September 1857. Turle was present for the storming and capture of the Heights before Delhi, and was dangerously wounded in action on 10th August 1857.

Turle who was promoted to Lieutenant in 1858 is then noted as having gone absent without leave whilst out there on 27th November 1858. This however was clearly solved, and he remained in the service, and was promoted to Captain on 10th April 1868, and was placed on half-pay in the honorary rank of Major on 24th July 1868. Turle then lived in Newton Stacey, near Stockbridge, Hampshire, that is located in the Test valley, and it was on the River Test that Turle must have honed his fly fishing skills, and it was for his dry-fly fishing that he became a great authority, being considered an expert in his day, and as his obituary in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle of 1909 stated: ‘His name will never be forgotten while trout fishing lasts, as the Turle knot for eyed-flies will perpetuate it. It was, we believe, the first attempt to fasten gut stiffly to an eyed-fly, and through other knots have been invented since, his is still extensively used, and in some cases is almost indispensable.’

Turle had his name put to a firm of Hardy & Co fishing rod, it being known as the ‘Major Turle’s Pattern’ which was sold by the famous firm between 1886 and 1906. Turle died on 27th January 1909. A copied image of the recipient in uniform wearing his medal is including within the research.