Great War German South West Africa and Second World War medals to the two Arter brothers, one of whom, the eldest, was born in Footscray, Victoria, Australia. The first, Private J.B. Arter, 1st South African Infantry Regiment, was born in Australi...

£225.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/32494
Description:

Great War German South West Africa and Second World War medals to the two Arter brothers, one of whom, the eldest, was born in Footscray, Victoria, Australia. The first, Private J.B. Arter, 1st South African Infantry Regiment, was born in Australia, but later settled in South Africa, and saw service during the campaign in German South West Africa, where his regiment gained a reputation for incredible marching under desert conditions in temperatures about 114 degrees in the shade, and was greatly credited with having saved the Western Cape. His younger bother, Corporal sometime Company Sergeant Major T. Arter, South African Coast Defence Corps, formerly Royal Durban Light Infantry, originally saw service between July 1922 and June 1936, ending up a C.S.M. He then saw service during the Second World War between March 1942 and March 1943 as a Corporal with the 5th (S.A.C.D.C.) Armoured Car Commando, and was awarded the Union of South Africa issue of the Efficiency Medal on 26th February 1943, one of only nine recipients of this award named to the South African Coast Defence Corps, he being the first of those nine recipients.

Group of 3: 1914-1915 Star; (PTE. J.B. ARTER. 1ST INFANTRY.); British War Medal and Victory Medal, last the South African bi-lingual issue; (PTE. J.B. ARTER. 1ST. INFANTRY.), mounted swing style as worn, first now detached from frayed ribbon.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Efficiency Medal, GVI| |1st type bust, Union of South Africa issue; (NO.43283. CPL. T. ARTER. S.A.C.D.C.)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Together with a Regiment Suid Westelike Distrikte cap badge.

James B. Arter was born on 26th February 1893 in Footscray, Victoria, Australia, the son of John and Sophia, nee Billing, and in July 1899 departed Victoria, Australia, aboard a passenger vessel on passage to London via Natal and Capetown. He however then settled in Durban, Natal, South Africa, and with the Great War enlisted into the South Africa Military Forces on 1st October 1914 as a Private (No.2370) with the 1st South African Infantry Regiment.

With the rebellion in German South West Africa, he then saw active service there, where the 1st Battalion of his regiment operated in the Upington area against Maritz and established a reputation for incredible marching under desert conditions in temperatures about 114 degrees in the shade. Together with the Imperial Light Horse, they saved the Western Cape. It was from that time that the close association and previous bond, ever since treasured and strengthened by the two regiments, was first established. Both units came in for special mention by General Smuts in Parliament as a result of their services in this area.

Arter was promoted to Corporal on 18th February 1915, and with the end of the campaign, was discharged on 14th August 1915. Arter went on to work as a plumber whilst living in Durban where he died on 29th June 1966.

Thomas Arter was born in 1902, he being the son of John and Sophia, nee Billing, and younger brother of James B. After. A resident of Durban, South Africa, he attested for service with the South African Cape Coast and Citizen Forces as a Private (No.43283) with the Royal Durban Light Infantry on 1st July 1922, and was promoted to Corporal on 1st August 1925, to Sergeant on 1st September 1925, and to Company Sergeant Major on 1st July 1932, before being transferred to the Class ‘A’ Reserve on 30th June 1936 ‘on medical grounds’. Arter worked as a foreman moulder, and resided in Umbilo, Durban.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, Arter was then a member of the Citizen Reserve, but due to the nature of his employment did not immediately enlist. However he then joined as a Corporal (No.43283) the South African Coast Defence Corps, and was posted to the 5th (S.A.C.D.C.) Armoured Car Commando on 12th March 1942. Arter was awarded the Efficiency Medal on 26th February 1943, one of only nine recipients of this award named to the South African Coast Defence Corps, he being the first of those nine recipients. Arter, who remained on service in South Africa, was discharged due to the “nature of his employment” on 14th March 1944.