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Great War family group of awards to the three Adcock brothers of Hopton-on-Sea, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, the first, a Private A.H. Adcock, 7th Service Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, who was serving out on the Western Front when he was awarded the Military M

Price: £950.00


Product ID: CMA/29135
Condition:: Nearly extremely fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

Great War family group of awards to the three Adcock brothers of Hopton-on-Sea, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, the first, a Private A.H. Adcock, 7th Service Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, who was serving out on the Western Front when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 16th July 1918, which confirms an award won during the German Spring Offensive. At the time he was serving in ‘D’ Company under Captain Crandon, the award being earned between 2nd to 6th April 1918 when in the trenches in the vicinity of Albert on the Somme. During this period, on the 4th April, some men occupying a post under a Sergeant Drew also of ‘D’ Company, when enduring bad weather, rain and mud in a position continuously swept by hostile gun and machine gun fire, and where snipers were active, opted to give themselves up to the enemy, and during a bombardment and bombing attack by the enemy, immediately threw up their hands in token of surrender, without making the slightest effort to defend the post. Despite being called back, they continued to make their way towards the enemy in order to complete their surrender, five men in total, and the company commander was forced to order them to be shot down, two being wounded, one being killed, the other two made it to the enemy lines. Adcock was one of 13 officers and men whose valuable work was recognised during the period from 2nd to 6th April 1918. The second brother, Deck Hand E.J. Adcock, Royal Naval Reserve, was killed in action aboard the minesweeping trawler H.M.T. “Tugula” when she was hit by a mine laid by the German submarine UC-1 off Lowestoft on 26th June 1916. The third brother was a Private J.H. Adcock, West Riding Regiment.

Group of 3: Military Medal, GVR bust; (24022 PTE. A.H. ADCOCK. 7/SUFF:R.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (24022 PTE. A.H. ADCOCK. SUFF.R.)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Group of 3: 1914-1915 Star; (538 S.D. E.J. ADCOCK. D.H., R.N.R.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (538 S.D. E.J. ADCOCK. D.H. R.N.R.)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Pair: British War Medal and Victory Medal; (26713. PTE. J.H. ADCOCK. W.RID.R.)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

The awards to all three brothers a framed in a period wooden bordered frame.

The first brother: Private A.H. Adcock, 7th Service Battalion, Suffolk Regiment. Albert H. Adcock, was the son of William and Ellen Adcock, of 2 Seaman Cottages, Hopton-on-Sea, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, and saw service during the Great War as a Private (No.24022) with the 7th Service Battalion, Suffolk Regiment, being present out on the Western Front, he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 16th July 1918, which confirms an award won during the German Spring Offensive. Adcock was serving with ‘D’ Company at the time of the award, and is mentioned in the Battalion War Diary, then company being then commanded by a Captain G.L. Crandon M.C.

The award was earned in the period from 2nd to 6th April 1918. On the 4th April an ugly incident occurred, when a post occupied by a Sergeant Drew came under attack. Under the N.C.O.’s influence, the men with him had discarded their equipment during the bombardment and immediately the bombing started Sergeant Drew threw up his hands in token of surrender, without making the slightest effort to defend his post. Captain Crandon shouted to them to defend their post, that was apparently heard owing to considerable hesitation on the part of three men. They all however went towards the enemy. Captain Crandon at once ordered his company to shoot at them and at least two of the five were wounded, whilst a Private (No.23312) H. Skinner was killed. Conditions were extremely difficult in bad weather, rain and mud. The trenches were continuously swept by hostile gun and machine gun fire, snipers were active. The appendices to the Dairy records that Pte. Adcock of ‘D’ Company was one of 13 officers and men whose valuable work was recognised during the period from 2nd to 6th April 1918.

The second brother: Deck Hand E.J. Adcock, Royal Naval Reserve. Edgar John Adcock was the son of William and Ellen Adcock, of 2 Seaman Cottages, Hopton-on-Sea, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, and saw service during the Great War as a Deck Hand (No.538 S.D.) with the Royal Naval Reserve. Adcock was serving aboard H.M. Trawler “Tugela’ when he was killed in action, his ship, being then used as a minesweeper, was sunk by a mind laid by the German submarine UC-1 off Lowestoft on 26th June 1916, eight of the crew being killed.

The third brother: Private J.H. Adcock, West Riding Regiment. James Holton Adcock enlisted on 10th December 1915 and saw service as a Private (No.26713) with the West Riding Regiment, being discharged on 10th April 1919.