Great War ANZAC First Day Gallipoli Lander, 26th April 1915 Anzac Cove Casualty, and Lone Pine 8th August 1915 Casualty Anzac Commemorative Medal 1967 awarded to Private E.A. Goldsmith, 1st Infantry Battalion, 1st Australian Infantry Brigade, 1st ...

£495.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/31727
Condition: sometime chrome plated, hence only Very Fine.
Categories:
    Description:

    Great War ANZAC First Day Gallipoli Lander, 26th April 1915 Anzac Cove Casualty, and Lone Pine 8th August 1915 Casualty Anzac Commemorative Medal 1967 awarded to Private E.A. Goldsmith, 1st Infantry Battalion, 1st Australian Infantry Brigade, 1st Australian Division. Goldsmith was one of the early volunteers for the Australian Imperial Force when he joined the 1st Battalion (No.171), and landed at Gallipoli with either the second or third wave on 25th April 1915. It was during the battle for the heights overlooking the beachhead that he was wounded in action on 26th April 1915, receiving a bullet wound to the neck, and being evacuated to Egypt. Having recovered he rejoined his battalion at Gallipoli on 8th July 1915, and was then wounded in action during the Battle of Lone Pine on 8th August 1915, receiving a bullet wound in the left shoulder. As a result of this second wound, which rendered him unable to move his left arm properly, he was evacuated to Egypt, and then to Australia, where he was discharged in January 1916. He was living in Queensland when he received the Anzac Commemorative Medal 1967 in March 1967, being amongst the first recipient’s of this award.

    Anzac Commemorative Medal 1967, sometime chrome plated, reverse named; (E.A. GOLDSMITH)

    Condition: sometime chrome plated, hence only Very Fine.

    Edwin Arthur Goldsmith was born in England in Hastings, Sussex, and having emigrated to Australia, settled in Sydney, New South Wales, where he married and worked as a railway porter. With the Great War he then enlisted into the Australian Imperial Force at Kensington, New South Wales on 1st September 1914, joining as a Private (No.171) the 1st Infantry Battalion with the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade. Goldsmith was one of the original volunteers, and having joined ‘A’ Company, would have arrived in Egypt with the 1st Australian Division in December 1914, and after further training then joined the Suez Canal static defences.

    Goldsmith was one of those who landed at Gallipoli on 25th April 1915, the first day of the landings which is now commemorated as ANZAC Day. His battalion came ashore with the second and third waves at Anzac Cove, and took part in the initial battle for the heights overlooking the beachhead in which the battalion took part in the attack on the hill known as Baby 700, the Turks regained control of the heights and the battalion was forced to withdraw to Russel Top and then later to the southern flank near Gaba Tebe. On 27th April, the battalion carried out a desperate bayonet charge for which one of the battalion's officers, Alfred Shout received a Military Cross and was Mention in Despatches. Shout would go on to win the Victoria Cross posthumously at Lone Pine in August 1915, and his triple awards for Gallipoli would make him the most decorated man of the campaign from the Australian perspective.

    For his part, Goldsmith is confirmed as having been wounded in action with a bullet wound to the neck on 26th April 1915, and was evacuated to Egypt where he was admitted to No.15 General Hospital at Alexandria on 1st May, before being posted to No.17 General Hospital on 24th May, and then returned to duty on 19th June. Goldsmith embarked to rejoin his battalion on 25th June, travelling back across the Mediterranean aboard the “Minniwaska” and rejoining his battalion at Gallipoli on 8th July 1915.

    On 6th August 1915, the 1st Australian Brigade launched an assault on the impregnable Ottoman position at Lone Pine. Led by the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Battalions (with the 1st Battalion held in reserve), the attack was orchestrated to divert Turkish attention and reinforcements away from the primary operation to the north of the line as the British sought to capture the Sari Air ridge. The Australian assault at Lone Pine commenced in the late afternoon just before sunset. An artillery barrage had preceded the attack, though according to historian Robin Prior the results had been "feeble" and the advance was hard-fought. Nonetheless, within half an hour the Australians had breached the Turkish trenches and seized their objectives. Despite the initial success, Australian casualties had been heavy and the 1st Battalion was ordered forward in preparation for the expected Turkish counter-attack. The battle descended into fierce fighting over the next three days, often in the form of what Bryan Perrett has described as "deadly bombing duels”. It was at this stage on the 8th August 1915 that Goldsmith was wounded in action for a second time, receiving a bullet wound in the left shoulder.

    Evacuated aboard the Hospital Ship “Delta” on that same day, he was then sent to Egypt where he was admitted to the No.1 General Hospital at Heliopolis on 11th August, and the following day, owing to heavy casualties, found himself moved to No.1 Auxiliary Hospital, also at Heliopolis. After treatment to some extent, he was embarked aboard the “Beltana” at Suez on 17th September 1915, and then sailed for Australia. Unable to move his left arm properly, Goldsmith was discharged medically unfit for further service on 20th January 1916. Goldsmith was living in Queensland when he was sent the Anzac Commemorative Medal 1967 on 18th March 1967, he being amongst the first batch of recipients of this commemorative award. He is additionally entitled to the 1914-1915 trio