Great War 2nd Salford Pals Western Front Breaching of the Hindenburg and Fonsomme Lines, and attack on Ramicourt early October 1918 single Military Medal awarded to Private H.C. Green, 16th Service Battalion - the 2nd Salford Pals, Lancashire Fusi...

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Product ID: CMA/32159
Condition: edge bruise at 4 o’clock, otherwise Nearly Extremely Fine.
Description:

Great War 2nd Salford Pals Western Front Breaching of the Hindenburg and Fonsomme Lines, and attack on Ramicourt early October 1918 single Military Medal awarded to Private H.C. Green, 16th Service Battalion - the 2nd Salford Pals, Lancashire Fusiliers, sometime East Lancashire Regiment, who was won his award at the beginning of October 1918 when the 2nd Salford Pals took part in the advance through the Hindenburg Line and reached the Fonsomme Line which lay incompletely wired, some three miles behind the main Hindenburg Line and was the last organised system of defences to be broken before open country was reached and open warfare, could after four years, be resumed. The attack on Ramicourt resulted in heavy casualties owing to enfilade machine gun fire from both flanks, and the commanding officer was killed. Green was one of 12 men of his battalion to be presented with the ribbon of the Military Medal in a parade held on 21st October 1918. Green later saw service with the 9th Service Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment attached to the Military Foot Police out in the Balkans from May 1919, Green was with the M.F.P as an Acting Sergeant on operations in South Russia during the Allied Intervention in the Russian Civli War at Batoum Province in Georgia during 1919 to 1920. It was whilst he was at Batoum that Green committed an offence in a cafe on 15th May 1920, he having ill-treated the Russian inhabitants and caused a disturbance in the cafe, and after having caused damage to the place, then refused to pay the bill for his food and drink, before being arrested by the Russian Police, as a result of which he was demoted and sent home.

Green had come into trouble with the Russian Police, he having ill-treated the Russian inhabitants and caused a disturbance in a cafe, causing damage to the place and then refusing to pay the bill for his food and drink. Arrested by the Russian Police, he was then dealt with by a Captain Cummins, the British Deputy Assistant Provost Marshal at Batoum, which led to his being demoted to Private on 18th May, and shipped home on 26th May. Green arrived home on 21st August 1920, and was discharged on 23rd September 1920.

Military Medal, GVR bust; (63501 PTE. H.C. GREEN. 16/LAN: FUS:)

Condition: edge bruise at 4 o’clock, otherwise Nearly Extremely Fine.

Hubert Colvin Green came from Liverpool, and having attested for service on 4th October 1917, was then transferred to the Army Reserve that same day. Mobilised on 13th December 1917, he was then posted as a Private to the 53rd Young Soldier’s Training Reserve Battalion, South Wales Borderers on 18th December 1917. Green then transferred as a Private (No.108549) to the 3rd/5th Battalion, Liverpool Regiment on 21st May 1918, before transferring to the 24th Infantry Base Depot, and being posted as one of a draft of men bound for the Western Front on 25th July 1918 where he was to join he 1st/5th Battalion, Liverpool Regiment. Green then transferred as a Private (No.63501) to the 16th Service Battalion - the 2nd Salford Pals, Lancashire Fusiliers on 12th August 1918, and was present with his battalion on operations as part of the 96th Brigade in the 32nd Division.

Green was serving in ‘H’ Company when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 14th May 1919 which indicates an award won during August to October 1918 during the final advance, and the 16th Battalion War Diary records that he was presented with the ribbon for his Military Medal by Major General Y.S. Lambert C.B., C.M.G., in a parade held on 21st October 1918 in which 11 other men were similarly decorated.

During the period in which the award was earned, the 16th Battalion took part in the advance through the Hindenburg Line and reached the Fonsomme Line which lay incompletely wired, some three miles behind the main Hindenburg Line and was the last organised system of defences to be broken before open country was reached and open warfare, could after four years, be resumed. The attack on Ramicourt resulted in heavy casualties owing to enfilade machine gun fire from both flanks. The commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Stone, D.S.O., was killed, and Major Robotham came up from the transport and took command. In all there were five officer casualties and 24 other ranks were killed, six officers and 134 other ranks were wounded and 18 missing. The Brigade was withdrawn and retreated to the Fonsomme Line at 5.00 a.m. on 3rd October 1918.

Green is then noted as having been hospitalised and evacuated home on 8th November 1918, where as a Lance Corporal, he was treated at a Military Convalescent Hospital from 20th November 1918, and was still with this hospital when he is noted as having been sent on home leave at 10 Canon Road, Anfield, Liverpool from the 13th to 22nd February 1919.

Green then transferred as a Private (No.52474) to the 9th Service Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment, which had ended the war in Salonica, and was then on duty in Constantinople where Green was sent to join it as part of the British Army of Occupation in Turkey and arrived out there on 30th May 1919. The 9th Battalion had however been disbanded in April 1919 and Green then found himself remaining out there and attached to the Military Foot Police as an Acting Sergeant (No.32724 - one report states No.22724) from 26th November 1919 and on operations in the Black Sea region of Southern Russia during the Allied Intervention in the Russian Civil War during 1919 to 1920. It was whilst he was out there on service at Batoum Province in Georgia then Green committed an offence in a cafe on 15th May 1920.

Green had come into trouble with the Russian Police, he having ill-treated the Russian inhabitants and caused a disturbance in a cafe, causing damage to the place and then refusing to pay the bill for his food and drink. Arrested by the Russian Police, he was then dealt with by a Captain Cummins, the British Deputy Assistant Provost Marshal at Batoum, which led to his being demoted to Private on 18th May, and shipped home on 26th May. Green arrived home on 21st August 1920, and was discharged on 23rd September 1920.