Germany - Third Reich: German Civilian Military Official Badge for the Military Administration in Belgium and Northern France, numbered ‘143’ on reverse, no makers marks. Rare, specifically with such a low issue number.

£425.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/33012
Condition: enamel work showing signs of age and wear, but generally good, overall about Good Very Fine.
Description:

Germany - Third Reich: German Civilian Military Official Badge for the Military Administration in Belgium and Northern France, numbered ‘143’ on reverse, no makers marks. Rare, specifically with such a low issue number.

Condition: enamel work showing signs of age and wear, but generally good, overall about Good Very Fine.

Worn by non-uniform military officials, usually women, in some Western Europe occupied territories. This one is for Belgium and Northern France. This badge is oval and measures 30mm high by 46mm wide. It comprises of three rings of enamel, the outer is black and measures 3mm. On this is the inscription at the top Militär Verwaltung and below Belgien und N Frankreich. The second oval is white and measures 2,5mm, and the inner is brick red and measures 2mm. Across the badge with the tips of its wings breaking the outer edge of the oval is a finely stamped Eagle holding in its talons a wreath with swastika. All the metal parts of the badge are silver-plated that is artificially oxidised. The reverse shows the indentations of the obverse design; at the base is a recessed circle into which is stamped the issue number of the badge. These numbers have been noted as high as 4500. At the top is a horizontal pin fitting that is attached by two rivets. The Military Administration in Belgium and Northern France (Militärverwaltung in Belgien und Nordfrankreich) was an interim occupation authority established by Nazi Germany that included present-day Belgium and the French departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais. The administration was also responsible for governing the zone interdite, a narrow strip of territory running along the French northern and eastern borders. It remained in existence until July 1944. Plans to transfer Belgium from the military administration to a civilian administration were promoted by the SS, and Hitler had been ready to do so until Autumn 1942, when he put off the plans for the time being. The SS had suggested either Josef Terboven or Ernst Kaltenbrunner as the Reich Commissioner of the civilian administration