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Germany - Third Reich: An interesting Battle of Stalingrad Casualty Wehrstammbuch - Military Service Record Book, and supporting documentation to Gefreiter Johann Klein, 12th Machine Gun Company, 230th Infantry Regiment, 76th Infantry Division, later a Horse Driver and then ultimately an Interpreter with the HQ Divisional Supply Commander 176 for the 76th Infantry Division with the 6th Army at Stalingrad, he being posted as missing in the Stalingrad Combat Area on 6th January 1943. Nothing further is known of him, despite a multitude of corresp

Price: £295.00


Product ID: CMA/27991
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Description:

Germany - Third Reich: An interesting Battle of Stalingrad Casualty Wehrstammbuch - Military Service Record Book, and supporting documentation to Gefreiter Johann Klein, 12th Machine Gun Company, 230th Infantry Regiment, 76th Infantry Division, later a Horse Driver and then ultimately an Interpreter with the HQ Divisional Supply Commander 176 for the 76th Infantry Division with the 6th Army at Stalingrad, he being posted as missing in the Stalingrad Combat Area on 6th January 1943. Nothing further is known of him, despite a multitude of correspondence from his wife with various military authorities. He may well have been either killed or taken prisoner, but either way he never returned home. Interestingly, he had originally been born to an ethnic German family in the Ukraine back in October 1914, but had later settled in Kreis Anklam/Mecklenburg, an area just south of the Baltic coast and to the north of Berlin.

Comprising the following documents:

1) Wehrstammbuch - Military Service Record Book, issued to Johann Klein, confirming units served in, awards, promotions, and active service areas.

2) Health Record Book, issued to Johann Klein, confirming his place and date of birth in Russia.

3) Employment Card, issued to Johann Klein, confirming his place and date of birth in Russia.

4) A certified true copy of a letter from the Planning Staff Stalingrad at Berlin - Arbeits Stab Stalingrad - to Klein’s wife, Mrs Freida Klein, in Frankfurt/Oder. It is informing her that no information is forthcoming about her husband who has been officially missing since 6th January 1943 in the Stalingrad combat area. The letter was forwarded to Klein’s wife on 30th October 1943 by the Nauen Recruiting Office.

5) A handwritten letter from Mrs Klein to the Nauen Recruiting Office requesting details of her husband’s army service to forward to the Stalingrad Planning Staff, dated Frankfurt/Oder 1st October 1943.

6) Handwritten letter from Mrs Klein to the Nauen Recruiting Office requesting details of her husband’s army service to forward to the Stalingrad Planning Staff. This is a hastener to her previous letter of 1st October 1943, dated Frankfurt/Oder 16th October 1943.

7) Confirmation from the Nauen Recruiting Office of Johann Klein’s dates of military service which had been requested by Klein’s wife in her letters of 1st and 16th October 1943.

8) A copy of a note from the Nauen Recruiting Office to the Stalingrad and Tunis Planning Staff providing details of Klein’s length of military service - three years, 6 months and 7 days. Dated 1944.

9) An A5 size note from the Stalingrad and Tunis Planning Staff copied to the Nauen Recruiting Office with a table including details of Klein’s date and place of birth in Russia, and units served in, and confirming that he is officially shown as missing since 6th January 1943. Issued at Potsdam on 18th February 1944.

10) Municipal Police Report No.2 with the official stamps of Schwerinsburg and Sarnow, both in Kreis Anklam/Mecklenburg, conceding Klein. Dated 4th April 1935, not entries being shown against him.

11) Medical Report on Klein, coincides with his first period of army service, dated Kreckow 28th February 1936, he was discharged the next day.

12) Muster Roll No.96 concerning Klein for his service with the 12th Company, 230th Infantry Regiment.

13) Muster Roll No.580 concerning Klein for his service with the 176th Supply Company.

14) Muster Roll No.140 concerning Klein for his service with the Headquarters of HQ Divisional Supply Commander 176.

15) Muster Roll No.282 concerning Klein for his service with the Divisional Supply Commander 6th Column of the 176th Infantry Division.

Johann Klein was born on 19th October 1914 in Chutor, Chulkovski District, Ukraine, Russia, though he obviously came from an ethnic German family who had settled in the Ukraine. His civil occupation is noted as having been a woodcutter and coal labourer, and he was a protestant, who had married Frieda Jänicke on 21st January 1939, and living in Kreis Anklam/Mecklenburg, an area just south of the Baltic coast and to the north of Berlin. He was located there as of April 1935. For some reason he had enlisted into the German Army for a period of just six weeks in January to February 1936, and was then discharged as a Class II Reservist.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, Klein was called up for military service on 27th August 1939, and posted as a Soldat to the 12th Machine Gun Company, 230th Infantry Division, 76th Infantry Division, seeing active service in France in 1940, in the Balkans in 1941 and then in Russia from 1941, where he transferred in July 1941 to the 176th Supply Company, part of the 76th Infantry Division’s supply services. There he initially saw service as a horse driver until he became an interpreter in August 1941 with the Headquarters of the 76th Infantry Division’s Supply Commander.

He then remained with the supply command’s HQ, except for a period from April to October 1942 when with a the Divisional Supply Commander 6th Column, and as part of the 6th Army, when back with the Headquarters of the Divisional Supply Commander 176.

Klein who was promoted to Obersoldat on 1st December 1941, and seen service throughout the first Russian winter of 1941 to 1942, had then been awarded the Eastern Front Winter War Medal on 10th August 1942, and was ultimately promote to Gefreiter on 1st October 1942.

Then present in the disastrous Battle of Stalingrad, being posted as missing in action in the Stalingrad Combat Area on 6th January 1943. Nothing further is known of him, despite a multitude of correspondence from his wife with various military authorities. He may well have been either killed or taken prisoner, but either way he never returned home.