Corps of Royal Engineers - The Burgoyne Scholarship Presentation Certificate as presented in perpetuity to The Soldier’s Daughter’s Home Hampstead, dated 14th August 1878. Most attractively hand written on parchment paper, and housed in its origin...

£275.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/32411
Condition: slight tears, slight foxing, otherwise clean and generally Good Condition.
Description:

Corps of Royal Engineers - The Burgoyne Scholarship Presentation Certificate as presented in perpetuity to The Soldier’s Daughter’s Home Hampstead, dated 14th August 1878. Most attractively hand written on parchment paper, and housed in its original metal scroll case, with chain linked top, and with the original vellum label, this attractively hand inscribed: ‘Certificate of the Burgoyne Scholarship In Memoriam of the late Field-Marshal Sir John Fox Burgoyne , Baronet, G.C.B. Chief of the Corps.’

Condition: slight tears, slight foxing, otherwise clean and generally Good Condition.

Provenance: original acquired together with the Field Marshall’s Baton Case to Field-Marshal Sir John Fox Burgoyne.

The Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Royal Engineers through Colonel J.M. Grant, Deputy Adjutant General of the Corps paid to the Soldier’s Daughter’s Home the sum of £385 under a Resolution of the General Committee of 14th November 1877, to be called The Burgoyne Scholarship, created in memory of the late Chief of the Royal Engineers, Field-Marshal Sir John Fox Burgoyne, Baronet, G.C.B.. This certificate commemorates the creation of the Scholarship and the donation of the funds to set it up, this having been read General Committee of The Soldier’s Daughter’s Home at their offices in Whitehall, London, on 14th August 1878. Signed in ink by Major General J.T. Boileau, Chairman of the Soldier’s Daughter’s Home.

The Soldier’s Daughter’s Home (also known as the Soldier’s Infant Home) was founded at Hampstead in 1855, towards the end of the Crimean War, which had led to the children of many soldiers being orphaned. It was later retitled the Royal Soldier’s Daughter’s Home