South Africa Eighth Xhosa War 1851-1853, Indian Mutiny and long service group awarded to Private William Underwood, 43rd Monmouthshire Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry), who saw service in South Africa from 1851 during the Eighth Xhosa War, and then went on to see service during the Indian Mutiny, when his regiment marched 1300 miles in six months; from Southern India to Bengal and engaged in many actions with the enemy along the way.

Price: £950.00


Product ID: CMA/28605
Condition: some contact wear, Very Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

South Africa Eighth Xhosa War 1851-1853, Indian Mutiny and long service group awarded to Private William Underwood, 43rd Monmouthshire Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry), who saw service in South Africa from 1851 during the Eighth Xhosa War, and then went on to see service during the Indian Mutiny, when his regiment marched 1300 miles in six months; from Southern India to Bengal and engaged in many actions with the enemy along the way.

Group of 3: South Africa Medal 1834-1853; (W. UNDERWOOD. 43RD. REGT.); Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-1859, no clasp; (WM UNDERWOOD, 43RD LT. INFY.); Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, Victoria small letter reverse, impressed naming; (2006 WM. UNDERWOOD 43RD. FOOT.)

Condition: some contact wear, Very Fine.

William Underwood was born in 1825 in Hawkedon, Suffolk, the son of John and Susan Underwood, and by 1829 was living in Stansfield, near Ware, Suffolk. Having worked as a labourer, Underwood then attested for service with the British Army at Bury St Edmunds on 6th February 1853. Underwood then joined as a Private (No.2006) the 43rd Monmouthshire Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry), and went on to see 21 years and 36 days service, of which 12 years and 4 months would be spent on overseas service, with 2 years and 3 months in South Africa, and 10 years and 1 month in India.

Underwood’s regiment returned from Canada in 1846, and it would appear that he then joined it from the Depot where he had been previously stationed. Then stationed in the south of England and then in Ireland until 1851, The 43rd were sent to South Africa for service in the Eighth Xhosa War in 1851. A detachment of his regiment was present aboard the troopship Birkenhead when she foundered on rocks at Danger Point, just off Gansbaai on 28th February 1852, however Underwood was not with those unfortunates, and instead was with the 43rd when it moved from South Africa to India arriving at Madras in January 1854. The regiment assisted in putting down the Indian Mutiny from 1857 to 1859. In the campaign, the regiment marched 1,300 miles in six months; from Southern India to Bengal and engaged in many actions with the enemy along the way. The regiment also won its first Victoria Cross awarded to Henry Addison in 1859.

Underwood did not accompany his regiment to New Zealand, and must have remained in India, and was awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal on 2nd September 1864, he having by this time already been discharged, he having taken his discharge on 29th March 1864, and returned to work as a labourer in Stansfield. Having married Lucy Balls in July 1864, they had a son, Harry Underwood in 1865, and by 1871 had moved to Elmstead, Essex. By 1881 he was back in Stansfield, and was still living there in 1911. His wife died in 1914, however his date of death is unknown. Confirmed as his full entitlement.