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The superb United Nations Korea, SAS Malayan Emergency Operation Termite July 1954 and Oman Arabian Peninsula 1957 operations, and subsequent United Nations Cyprus, Aden and Northern Ireland long service group awarded to Staff Sergeant Roy Dove, 2...

£5,950.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/28509
Condition: light contact wear, Good Very Fine.
Description:

The superb United Nations Korea, SAS Malayan Emergency Operation Termite July 1954 and Oman Arabian Peninsula 1957 operations, and subsequent United Nations Cyprus, Aden and Northern Ireland long service group awarded to Staff Sergeant Roy Dove, 22nd Special Air Service Regiment and Royal Tank Regiment, who is confirmed as having passed selection for the SAS out in Singapore and then seen operational service with A Squadron, joining them in the middle of Operation Termite in July 1954, he went on to take part in a number of operations and deep penetration patrols against the Communist Terrorists, and was one of the early pioneers of the SAS technique of ‘Tree-jumping’, namely parachuting into deep jungle. Having re-enlisted into the 2nd Royal Tanks in 1960, he had originally seen service with the Royal Tank Regiment as a National Serviceman back in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s, as well as a spell in the Territorial’s with the County of London Yeomanry, he then want on to see service in Libya, Cyprus, Aden, and Northern Ireland, and was from 1965, the House Sergeant to Major General Richard Erskine Ward, commanding the 1st Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment, followed by Lieutenant General Sir Alan Taylor, as Commanding Officer of 1st Division, General Officer Commanding South Eastern District, and Deputy Commander of the United Kingdom Liaison Force. From 1976 Dove served with the 1st Royal Tank Regiment as Officer’s Mess Steward. As of the mid 1980’s he was listed as the most be-medalled member of the regiment. His journal entry on his discharge from the Royal Tanks, and written by a fellow former member of the SAS, states: ‘Having service in the SAS myself I probably understand Roy Dove better than anyone else in the Regiment - he’s nuts!’

Group of 5: United Nations Medal for Korea; General Service Medal 1918-1962, EIIR Dei.Grat. bust, 2 Clasps: Malaya, Arabian Peninsula; (22122080 TPR. R. DOVE. SAS.); United Nations Medal for Cyprus; Campaign Service Medal 1962, 2 Clasps: South Arabia, Northern Ireland; (22122080 S SGT R DOVE RTR); Regular Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, EIIR Dei.Grat. bust; (22122080 SGT. R. DOVE RTR.), mounted court style for wear.

Condition: light contact wear, Good Very Fine.

Together with the following documents and photographs:

Letter from the Special Air Service Regimental Association to Captain Mike Parkes, dated 25th April 1984, confirming Dove’s address, as 34 Carlton Terrace, Sydenham, London. Signed by Dave Newell, a Major and early member of the SAS, recipient of the OBE, and a Second World War veteran of the SOE in Albania and Force 136 in Japanese occupied Malaya.

Letter from the recipient to Captain Mike Parkes, dated 19th October 1987, enclosing two photographs from his service, the photos are also included, one shows Sgt Dove on the right, standing next to Jock Hawkins, a future Regimental Sergeant Major of the SAS, and a recipient of the Military Medal in Oman, the other photo is of the recipient and one other on the day they got their SAS jump wings.

Copied image from an article titled ‘Farewells— Future Discharges’, with photograph of Staff Sergeant Roy Dove, named given beneath, showing him wearing his shoulder wings for the Special Air Service. Also an article detailing his service as printed on his leaving the British Army. Both of these were also sent by the recipient to Captain Mike Parkes in October 1987.

Roy Dove was called up for National Service on St Patrick’s Day 1949, then saw service as a Private (No.22122080) with the 7th Royal Tank Regiment for the next 18 months, but on completion of his national service then saw a further 12 months service with the Territorial Army in the County of London Yeomanry. Dove then re-enlisted into the Regular Army in early 1952 for service with the 5th Royal Tank Regiment, and saw service as a Motor Transport Driver with this regiment in Korea, but in the immediate period after the war had ended, hence his entitlement only the United Nations Medal for Korea.

On his return from Korea, Dove then volunteered for the Special Air Service in Malaya, and having passed selection at Singapore, then saw service during the Malayan Emergency with ‘A’ Squadron of 22 SAS, joining then in the middle of Operation ‘Termite’, which was being conducted in the deep jungle of Malaya. Operation ‘Termite’ occurred in July 1954, and involved extensive attacks on communist camps, dropping over 200 British troops into the jungle. Communist casualties were low but many camps were destroyed.

Dove went on to take part in a number of operations and deep penetration patrols against the Communist Terrorists and throughout his service parachuted in Valetta aircraft and helicopters, being one of the early pioneers of the SAS technique of ‘Tree-jumping’, namely parachuting into deep jungle. As the Malaya campaign was winding down, they dispatched two squadrons of 22 SAS from Malaya to assist in Oman, and Dove would have then been present in the Arabian Peninsula operations that occurred from 1st January 1957. Dove left 22 SAS later that same year on demobilisation.

Dove then re-enlisted into the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment in 1960, and subsequently served with the regiment in Libya, Ulster, Cyprus as part of the United Nations Peace Keeping Forces, and the British Army of the Rhine until 1965 when he was appointed House Sergeant, the military equivalent of a major-domo, to Major General Richard Erskine Ward, who was commanding the 1st Division Headquarters and Signal Regiment. Dove then remained in this position when Lieutenant General Sir Alan Taylor took over and remained with General Taylor for the next 8 years throughout the General’s appointments as Commanding Officer of 1st Division, General Officer Commanding South Eastern District, and Deputy Commander of the United Kingdom Liaison Force. In 1976, when a Staff Sergeant, Dove joined the 1st Royal Tank Regiment and then served as Officer’s Mess Steward, being present on operations in Northern Ireland towards the very end of his service.

The man who was tasked with writing up Dove’s service for the Journal of the 1st Royal Tank Regiment finished with this: ‘During his service he was awarded the United Nations Medal Korea, The GSM with Clasp ‘Malaya’, the United Nations Medal Cyprus, the GSM 1962 with clasp ‘Northern Ireland’, and The Long Service & Good Conduct Medal - which makes him currently the most be-medalled soldier in the Regiment (I’ll be glad to see him go!)

Having service in the SAS myself I probably understand Roy Dove better than anyone else in the Regiment - he’s nuts! Seriously though - I can testify to his determination and courage, his loyalty and sense of comradeship, his generosity. He has been a good friend and shall miss his friendship. We wish him every success in the future.’

Dove’s service write-up fails to mention his clasp entitlement and participation in the operations in both the Arabian Peninsula and then South Arabia in Aden, however this seems an error on the part of the writer, as opposed to actual entitlement, both clasps being correctly riveted as issued, and almost certainly correct.