Peninsular War Battle of Albuhera May 1811 Regimental Colour Party Officer Casualty Warrant of Appointment as an Ensign as issued to one J. Sarsfield, who volunteered from the 97th Regiment of Foot for service with the 34th Cumberland Regiment of Foot, and was granted the rank Ensign on 27th June 1810, his warrant being signed in ink by King George III - at a time when the King was both insane and blind. Sarsfield went on to see service in the Peninsular War from August 1810, and was present at the battle of Busaco, the siege of Olivença and t

Price: £450.00


Product ID: CMA/27357
Condition: document faded in places and lacking seal, shows wear comparable with its age and use, the majority of the writing legible.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

Peninsular War Battle of Albuhera May 1811 Regimental Colour Party Officer Casualty Warrant of Appointment as an Ensign as issued to one J. Sarsfield, who volunteered from the 97th Regiment of Foot for service with the 34th Cumberland Regiment of Foot, and was granted the rank Ensign on 27th June 1810, his warrant being signed in ink by King George III - at a time when the King was both insane and blind. Sarsfield went on to see service in the Peninsular War from August 1810, and was present at the battle of Busaco, the siege of Olivença and the first siege of Badajoz. He was mortally wounded in action whilst carrying the Regimental Colour at the Battle of Albuhera on 16th May 1811, and died the following day on 17th May 1811. Canon’s history of the 34th Foot records that: ’The heads of the enemy’s masses were broken by the steady fire of the British soldiers, who closed on their numerous adversaries, and sternly contended for victory. The Thirty-fourth were severely engaged; many officers and men fell, and Ensign Sarsfield, bearing the regimental colour, was shot; the colour was seized by another officer, and the battalion pressed forward upon its opponents, who, by a determined and continued attack, were driven from the heights, and the British soldiers stood victorious on the contested hill.’

Warrant of Appointment as an Ensign in the 34th Cumberland Regiment of Foot, issued to J. Sarsfield, as issued at the Court at St James on 27th June 1810, signed in ink by King George III - at a time when the King was both insane and blind.

Condition: document faded in places and lacking seal, shows wear comparable with its age and use, the majority of the writing legible.

As issued to and carried by Ensign J. Sarsfield, who volunteered from the 97th Regiment of Foot for appointment as an Ensign with the 34th Cumberland Regiment of Foot, and was granted his commission on 27th June 1810 through the Court of St James, his warrant being signed by the reigning monarch, King George III, at a time when the King was both blind and insane.

Sarsfield then served in the Peninsula War from August 1810, and was present at the battle of Busaco, the siege of Olivença and the first siege of Badajoz. He was mortally wounded in action whilst carrying the Regimental Colour at the Battle of Albuhera on 16th May 1811, and died the following day on 17th May 1811.
His death is described in Cannon’s history: ‘At a critical moment the Fusiliers mounted the hill on the right of the remnant of the third brigade, at the same time the Twenty-eighth, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-ninth passed on its left; and this gallant line arrested the progress of the French columns, which were pressing forward in anticipation of victory. The heads of the enemy’s masses were broken by the steady fire of the British soldiers, who closed on their numerous adversaries, and sternly contended for victory. The Thirty-fourth were severely engaged; many officers and men fell, and Ensign Sarsfield, bearing the regimental colour, was shot; the colour was seized by another officer, and the battalion pressed forward upon its opponents, who, by a determined and continued attack, were driven from the heights, and the British soldiers stood victorious on the contested hill.