An India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia, awarded to Private John Moldrick, 78th Seaforth Highlanders, who having fought during the Persian Campaign in 1857 when his regiment distinguished itself in leading the attack at the battle of Khushab and at Mohammerrah, then returned to India and formed part of Sir Henry Havlock’s first relief force for the beleaguered defenders at Lucknow, being himself killed in action during the final assault to force through to the beleaguered defenders on 25th September 1857. On this day, the 78th

Price: £680.00


Product ID: CMA/25921
Condition: some contact wear. Very Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

An India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia, awarded to Private John Moldrick, 78th Seaforth Highlanders, who having fought during the Persian Campaign in 1857 when his regiment distinguished itself in leading the attack at the battle of Khushab and at Mohammerrah, then returned to India and formed part of Sir Henry Havlock’s first relief force for the beleaguered defenders at Lucknow, being himself killed in action during the final assault to force through to the beleaguered defenders on 25th September 1857. On this day, the 78th Highlanders took a wrong turning, but were able to capture a rebel battery near the Qiasarbagh palace before rejoining the main force, and then reached the Machchhi Bhawan. The advance was made through heavily defended narrow lanes. In all, the relief force lost 535 men out of 2000, incurred mainly in this last rush.
India General Service Medal 1854-1895, 1 Clasp: Persia; (J. MOLDRICK, 78TH HIGHLANDERS.)
Condition: some contact wear. Very Fine.
John Moldrick saw service as a Private (No.2570) with the 78th Seaforth Highlanders, and was present out in India when his regiment sailed to Persia in January 1857, and disembarked at Bushire on 1st February 1857 where his uint formed part of the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, the brigade being commanded by Colonel W. Hamilton, who until recently had been commanding officer of the 78th Highlanders.
The short lived war in Persia was caused by various political miscalculations by both the Persians and the British, and was triggered by the annexation of the Afghanistan city of Herat by the Persians on 25th October 1856, a city that was considered to be the key to Afghanistan. The British declared war on 1st November 1856 and instead of an expected land based invasion, the British decided to retaliate both on land and at sea. On 9th December, the fort at Reshire was captured at the expense of 11 killed in action and 29 wounded. The first Victoria Cross to the Indian Army was awarded for this action.
On the 10th, an Indian Naval Squadron commanded by Commodore Young bombarded Bushire in the Persian Gulf, which surrendered. On the arrival of Major General Sir James Outram with an expeditionary force, and advance was made inland from Bushire to Borasjoon, where many stores were captured on 8th February 1857. On the same day, during their immediate withdrawal, the force was attacked at Koosh-ab and the Persians were heavily defeated. British casualties were 16 killed in action and 56 wounded with two Victoria Crosses being awarded, both to the officers of the 3rd Bombay Light Cavalry. After his return to Bushire, Outram left Major General Stalker to hold the town, whilst he crossed the Persian Gulf and advanced up the Euphrates delta to Mohammerrah, some 60 miles inland. Here on 26th March 1857, the Navy bombarded the Persian positions and forts. Naval casualties were 5 killed in action and 18 wounded. After a short while the enemy positions were either silenced or completely destroyed, and troops were landed under Brigadier General Havelock, who promptly entered the city, captured a further large supply of stores. He very generously gave full credit for the ease with which he accomplished his mission to the navy, who in turn owed its immunity from heavy casualties to the foresight of the Acting Commodore James Rennie, who gave orders for the bombarding ships to be surrounded with trusses of hay!
The Persians withdrew to Akwaz, about 100 miles up the Karoon River, where they were again attacked by a combined expedition, the navy under Acting Commodore Rennie and a small force composed of about 300 men from the 64th and 78th Foot under Captain G.H. Hunt, 78th Foot. The town was captured with no British casualties on 1st April 1857, after which the force returned to Mohammerrah, where it learnt that peace had been signed in Paris on 4th March, under the terms of which Herat was to be evacuated by the Perians. 900 men from the 78th Highlanders received the Persia clasp to the India General Service Medal, and the regiment had particularly distinguished itself in leading the attack at the battle of Khushab (Koosh-ab) and at Mohammerrah.
With the Indian Mutiny having broken out, Moldrick was then posted with his regiment back to India, and with the siege of Lucknow in full swing, then formed part of Sir Henry Havlock’s first relief force for the beleaguered defenders. It was during the attempt to get through to Lucknow, when the final advance occurred on 25th September 1857, that Moldrick was killed in action.
On this day, the day the relief was achieved, the force met heavy resistance trying to cross the Charbagh Canal, but succeeded after nine out of ten men of a forlorn hope were killed storming a bridge. They then turned to their right, following the west bank of the canal. The 78th Highlanders took a wrong turning, but were able to capture a rebel battery near the Qiasarbagh palace, before finding their way back to the main force. After further heavy fighting, by nightfall the force had reached the Machchhi Bhawan. Outram proposed to halt and contact the defenders of the Residency by tunnelling and mining through the intervening buildings, but Havelock insisted on an immediate advance. He feared that the defenders of the Residency were so weakened that they might still be overwhelmed by a last-minute rebel attack. The advance was made through heavily defended narrow lanes. In all, the relief force lost 535 men out of 2000, incurred mainly in this last rush.