An emotive Canadian Great War 3rd May 1918 Trench Raider’s Military Medal and subsequent casualty group awarded to Private and Acting Lance Corporal J. Sloan, 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion - North West, the Saskatchewan Regiment, who saw service out on the Western Front from January 1917, and whilst part of a large trench raid comprising two companies in the early morning of 3rd May 1918, was one of 15 men of his battalion to win the Military Medal, when five unwounded and three wounded prisoners were taken together with 5 enemy machine guns

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Product ID: CMA/25852
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Description:

An emotive Canadian Great War 3rd May 1918 Trench Raider’s Military Medal and subsequent casualty group awarded to Private and Acting Lance Corporal J. Sloan, 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion - North West, the Saskatchewan Regiment, who saw service out on the Western Front from January 1917, and whilst part of a large trench raid comprising two companies in the early morning of 3rd May 1918, was one of 15 men of his battalion to win the Military Medal, when five unwounded and three wounded prisoners were taken together with 5 enemy machine guns. Unfortunately for Sloan, he was then severely wounded in action by a gunshot wound to the head only a few days later on 14th May 1918, and died of his wounds on 22nd May 1918.

Group of 3: Military Medal, GVR bust; (204331 PTE-A.L.CPL- J. SLOAN. 28/SASK:R.); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (204331 PTE J. SLOAN. 28-CAN.INF.)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

John Sloan was born on 8th October 1883 in Dumbarton, Scotland, and having emigrated to Canada, where he settled in Nokomis, Saskatchewan and worked as a farmer, with the outbreak of the Great War, he then enlisted into the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Saskatoon on 28th February 1916, and joined as a Private (No.204331) the 96th Overseas Battalion - Canadian Highlanders.

Arriving in England on 6th October 1916, he then transferred to the 92nd Overseas Battalion on 8th October 1916, and transferred to the 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion - North West, the Saskatchewan Regiment at East Sandling on 5th January 1917, and then arrived out on the Western Front on 6th January 1917, before transferring to the 2nd Ontario Battalion on 14th January 1917. He rejoined the 28th Battalion on 5th March 1917, and then took part in the Third Battle of Ypres, before being posted on leave to England from 21st December 1917 to 6th January 1918.

It was whilst an Acting Lance Corporal and part of a large trench raid on the night of 3rd May 1918 in the early morning that Sloan won his Military Medal for bravery in the field, his award being subsequently posthumously published in the London Gazette on 29th August 1918. One of 15 men of his battalion to be awarded the Military Medal for this action, whilst no specific citation survives, details of the raid do.

The War Diary records: ‘At 1.55 am raiding party was reported in position and at 2.10 am assembly was reported complete, same being duly reported to Brigade. At 2.30 am barrage opened up. The reply thereto was long in coming and was very light and scattered. According to report received later our barrage was very effective and caused the enemy heavy casualties. The companies engaged carried out successfully their operation according to schedule and met with slight opposition as the enemy appeared to have largely withdrawn on opening of barrage. However, five unwounded and three wounded prisoners were taken together with 5 enemy machine guns and a large number of enemy dead were reported in No Man’s Land. Our casualties were approximately 44, three of whom were killed. ‘D’ and ‘A’ Companies were reported safely back at 2.54 am and ‘B’ Company at 3 am and this terminated a very successful operation. Throughout the preparation and conduct of operation the very greatest assistance was rendered by the 29th Battalion who were at the time holding the line and they spared no effort in giving us all the assistance in their power.’

Sloan was himself severely wounded in action by a gunshot wound to the head only a few days later on 14th May 1918, and having been evacuated by the 2nd/1st London Field Ambulance, and then moved to the 57th Casualty Clearing Station, he died on wounds on 22nd May 1918, being buried in Aubignay Communal Cemetery Extension.