A very fine yet telling Northern Ireland and Falklands War 1982 2 Para Battle of Goose Green veteran’s pair awarded to Sergeant later Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Company Sergeant Major P. Dunn, 2nd Battalion, Parachute Regiment, who originally enlisted into the Territorial Army in 1965 with 12th/13th (Yorkshire and Lancashire) Para Battalion, before serving with the 4th Para Battalion from 1967, and then having transferred to the regulars, he served with 2 Para from 1974 to 1979, including operations in Northern Ireland. Posted back to 4 Para

Price: £2,750.00


Product ID: CMA/25935
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Description:

A very fine yet telling Northern Ireland and Falklands War 1982 2 Para Battle of Goose Green veteran’s pair awarded to Sergeant later Warrant Officer 2nd Class and Company Sergeant Major P. Dunn, 2nd Battalion, Parachute Regiment, who originally enlisted into the Territorial Army in 1965 with 12th/13th (Yorkshire and Lancashire) Para Battalion, before serving with the 4th Para Battalion from 1967, and then having transferred to the regulars, he served with 2 Para from 1974 to 1979, including operations in Northern Ireland. Posted back to 4 Para as a Permanent Staff Instructor from 1979 to 1982, he then rejoined 2 Para and is believed to have served with the Headquarters Company during the Falklands War when his battalion performed its remarkable attack on Goose Green on 28th May 1982, in which the commanding officer, ‘H’ Jones, won a posthumous Victoria Cross. Dunn was subsequently medically discharged in 1992 and was diagnosed as suffering from PTSD in 1999.

Campaign Service Medal 1962, 1 Clasp: Northern Ireland; (24309783 L/CPL. P. DUNN PARA.); South Atlantic Medal 1982 with Rosette; (24309783 SGT P DUNN PARA), mounted court style as worn.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Phil Dunn, apparently nicknamed Tombstonepete, who also goes by the name of Peter Eastwood, saw service originally in the Territorial Army as a Private (No.24309783) with 12th/13th (Yorkshire and Lancashire) Para Battalion, Parachute Regiment from 1965 to 1967, when his battalion then amalgamated with the 17th (Durham Light Infantry) Para Battalion to become the 4th Battalion, Parachute Regiment.

Having then transferred to the regular’s, he saw service with the 2nd Battalion, Parachute Regiment from 1974 to 1979, and was present on operations in Northern Ireland as a Lance Corporal, before returning to the 4th Battalion as a Permanent Staff Instructor from 1979 to 1982. With the outbreak of the Falklands War, Dunn was immediately recalled to the 2nd Battalion, and as such then saw service as part of Operation Corporate. On 26th April 1982, his battalion was posted aboard the S.S. Norland for the voyage down to the South Atlantic.

On 2nd April 1982 Argentina had invaded Port Stanley – the capital of the Falkland Islands Dependencies. With only about 80 marines for defence, the Islands and South Georgia were quickly overrun. A British Task Force was rapidly assembled to retake the Islands, with its Land Element centred on 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines. At this time 3 PARA was spearhead Battalion and attached to 3 Commando Brigade RM leaving UK on 9th April on SS Canberra. 2 PARA at 5 days' notice to move, was also stood to and departed on 26th April on MV Norland. During the long voyage south, both Battalions carried out intensive training. 3 Commando Brigade RM went ashore at Ajax Bay on the Night of 21st/22nd May.

2 PARA established itself on Sussex Mountain protecting the South of the Bridgehead without opposition. 3 PARA landed in the North near Port San Carlos driving off a group of 40 enemy. Over the next week Argentinian air attacks against the beach-head and shipping took place almost daily. On 26th May, 2 PARA was ordered to move South and engage the Argentinian Strategic Reserve and Airfield on the Darwin/Goose Green Peninsular. The attack began during the early hours of 28 May with Naval and Artillery support. By daylight, however, it was held up by strong enemy defensive positions near Darwin and the Commanding Officer, Lt-Col H Jones, was killed trying to take out a machine gun post. The assault continued with some ferocious trench to trench fighting and by last light the whole peninsular less the Goose Green Settlement was taken. Negotiations with the Argentinians produced their surrender the next day. Around 45-50 Argentinians were killed, and The Official History of the Falklands Campaign conservatively reports 961 Argentinian prisoners taken, although as its author Lawrence Freedman noted the counting process was possibly less precise than the number suggests, and other accounts of the battle have reported a larger prisoner count.

Briefly under command of 5 Infantry Brigade, elements of 2 PARA conducted a coup de main operation, 28 miles inside no-man's land, on 2nd June. They secured the objectives of Bluff Cove and Fitzroy, with a view to opening a southern flank of operations. On the night of 13th/14th June 2 PARA passed behind 3 PARA and, supported by 3 PARA mortars, attacked another key objective - Wireless Ridge. This again was secure by first light and shortly afterwards the enemy resistance collapsed. Both Battalions followed up and were the first troops to enter Port Stanley. Forty two members of The Parachute Regiment and attached personnel were killed in action, with a further 95 personnel from the two Battalions wounded in action. Two Victoria Crosses were posthumously awarded to Lt Col H Jones, 2 PARA, and Sgt Ian McKay of 3 PARA.

Dunn remained with 2 Para till his discharge in 1992, he having been promoted to Warrant Officer 2nd Class. Dunn was, in his own words, ‘medically boarded in 1992 and have not worked since leaving the army. Diagnosed PTSD in 1999. Just stopped going for treatment to Combat Stress after 5 years (to many wankers). Now living as best as one can, with both Physical and PTSD injuries.’ This was according to a message posted by him under the name of Phil Eastwood on a website found online. His service number is what matches him. The message shows an image of him in fairly recent life, and the website Paradata shows an image of him when a Sergeant Major with Battalion Headquarters, he having then taken part in athletics race, the battalion second in command being then Major Max Houghton.