​ A very fine Second World War North Africa Defence of Tobruk Stretcher Bearer’s Military Medal and subsequent Burma Chindits Operations group awarded to Lance Corporal T.L. Mead, 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, who on 26th November 1941 ‘for 2 hours, continually under heavy and accurate fire from enemy artillery of all calibres, up to and including 9.2”’ coolly and calmly continued to collect and attend to wounded, without any regard to personal danger.

Price: £1,850


Product ID: CMA/23083
Condition: Good Very Fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

A very fine Second World War North Africa Defence of Tobruk Stretcher Bearer’s Military Medal and subsequent Burma Chindits Operations group awarded to Lance Corporal T.L. Mead, 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, who on 26th November 1941 ‘for 2 hours, continually under heavy and accurate fire from enemy artillery of all calibres, up to and including 9.2”’ coolly and calmly continued to collect and attend to wounded, without any regard to personal danger.
Group of 7: Military Medal, GVI 1st type bust; (6009855 L.CPL. T.L. MEAD. ESSEX R.); General Service Medal 1918-1962, GVI 1st type bust, 1 Clasp: Palestine; (6009855 PTE. T.L. MEAD. ESSEX.R.); 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star with 8th Army Clasp; Burma Star; Defence Medal; War Medal. Mounted swing style for wear.
Condition: Good Very Fine.

Telfer Lewis Mead saw service as a Private (No.6009855) with the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment, out in Palestine during the Arab Rebellion, and then with the outbreak of the Second World War went on to see service in Egypt and North Africa as part of the 8th Army. Seeing service in the 23rd Infantry Brigade as part of the Tobruk Fortress troops, Mead was serving as a Lance Corporal and stretcher bearer with the Regimental Aid Post when in action on 26th November 1941 he performed the actions which resulted in him being awarded the Military Medal.

The recommendation reads as follows: ‘For great devotion to duty. This N.C.O is a Stretcher Bearer at the R.A.P. On 26th November for 2 hours, continually under heavy and accurate fire from enemy artillery of all calibres, up to and including 9.2” he collected wounded from the area, which was obviously regarded as a H.Q. In spite of the intense fire, this N.C.O. coolly and calmly continued to collect and attend to wounded, without any regard to personal danger. His action undoubtedly saved many lives and was a magnificent example to all of courage and devotion to duty.’

Mead was awarded the Military Medal in the London Gazette for 24th February 1942, and went on to see service in Syria and then Burma with the 14th Army, where the 23rd Infantry Brigade, of which the 1st Battalion, Essex Regiment was a part, then formed part of the 70th Infantry Division, which became the core of the Brigadier Orde Wingate’s Special Force, known as the Chindits. The brigade's role changed to Long Range Penetration in September 1943; the 1st Battalion formed 44 and 56 Columns of the Chindits and operated in the Japanese rear during the battles of Imphal and Kohima, two battles that turned the tide of the war against Japan in the Far East.


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