A very fine Great War Third Battle of Ypres early to mid August 1917 attack on Hill 70 light railway maintenance and construction Military Medal group awarded to Corporal later Sergeant R.A. Shoults, 107th Canadian Pioneer Battalion, later 1st Battalion, Canadian Engineers, who was present out on the Western Front from March 1917, and was then decorated for his service in the eight days previous to and including the 15th August 1917, he having been involved in patrolling and repairing train lines and during this time was under heavy shell fire

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Product ID: CMA/25859
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Description:

A very fine Great War Third Battle of Ypres early to mid August 1917 attack on Hill 70 light railway maintenance and construction Military Medal group awarded to Corporal later Sergeant R.A. Shoults, 107th Canadian Pioneer Battalion, later 1st Battalion, Canadian Engineers, who was present out on the Western Front from March 1917, and was then decorated for his service in the eight days previous to and including the 15th August 1917, he having been involved in patrolling and repairing train lines and during this time was under heavy shell fire several times daily. On August 15th, in charge of six men, he kept the track repaired thus enabling the wounded to be carried expeditiously to the dressing station, and this under the most severe shell fire, when supporting the attack on Hill 70.

Group of 3: Military Medal, GVR bust; (718437 CPL R.A. SHOULTS. 107/CAN:PNR:BN:); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (718437 SJT. R.A. SHOULTS. C.E.)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Roy Arthur Shoults was born on 26th December 1880 in Parkhill, Ontario, but later lived in Hanna, Alberta and worked as a bookkeeper. With the outbreak of the Great War he attested for service with the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Winnipeg on 7th February 1916, and joined as a Private (No.718437) the 107th Canadian Infantry Battalion. Arriving in England on 25th September 1916, he suffered a head injury whilst at Whitley Camp on 25th October 1916, and was only discharged from hospital on 21st November 1916. His unit was then redesigned as a Pioneer unit and titled the 107th Canadian Pioneer Battalion, with Shouts being then appointed to Acting Lance Corporal on 14th March 1917.

Shoults then went out to the Western Front on 25th March 1917, and was appointed to Lance Corporal on 29th March 1917, before being appointed to Acting Corporal on 18th August 1917, and promoted to Corporal on 18th August 1917. It was whilst on duty repairing train lines during the Third Battle of Ypres that Shoults won his Military Medal, this being for his work during the eight days previous to 15th August 1917, and his award was then published in the London Gazette for 19th November 1917.

The recommendation reads as follows: ‘This Non Commissioned Officer was employed for eight days previous to August 15th 1917 in patrolling and repairing train lines and during this time was under heavy shell fire several times daily. On August 15th, in charge of six men, he kept the track repaired thus enabling the wounded to be carried expeditiously to the dressing station, and this under the most severe shell fire.’

At the time of his award, his battalion was mostly employed on duty constructing trenches across No Man’s Land in support of the attack on Hill 70, and this work was done under heavy hostile fire. The battalion had 5 officers and 78 other ranks wounded, and 19 other ranks killed, with a further 39 being wounded but remaining on duty. The Battalion War Diary indicates that the Military Medal’s for this period were presented at Ballin on 20th January 1918 by the General Officer Commanding the 1st Canadian Division to 13 men of unit, Shoults being amongst them.

The Battalion was then re-designated the 107th Pioneer Battalion and transferred to the Canadian Engineers, before being re-organised and split and distributed between the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalion’s of the Canadian Engineers on 24th May 1918, with Shoults being posted to the 1st Battalion. Shoults was wounded in action on 26th July 1918 as a result of a gas shell, and was evacuated to the 1st Canadian Field Ambulance. Promoted to Sergeant on 7th February 1919, he arrived in England on 26th March 1919 and was then returned to Canada on 6th May 1919 and discharged on 17th May 1919.