A unique name Battle of the Somme Pozieres Ridge Officer Casualty Great War Memorial Plaque issued in memory of Hubert George Baker, a 2nd Lieutenant with the 1st/4th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, who was present out on the Western Front from 27th July 1916, and was killed in action whilst gallantly leading his platoon in advance of the battalion attack on German trenches north of the village of Ovillers-La-Boiselle on the night of 15th to 16th August 1916, though his death is officially dated for the 17th August 1916.

Price: £185.00


Product ID: CMA/25800
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Description:

A unique name Battle of the Somme Pozieres Ridge Officer Casualty Great War Memorial Plaque issued in memory of Hubert George Baker, a 2nd Lieutenant with the 1st/4th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, who was present out on the Western Front from 27th July 1916, and was killed in action whilst gallantly leading his platoon in advance of the battalion attack on German trenches north of the village of Ovillers-La-Boiselle on the night of 15th to 16th August 1916, though his death is officially dated for the 17th August 1916.

Great War Memorial Plaque named to; (HUBERT GEORGE BAKER)

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Hubert George Baker was born on 11th September 1894 in Clifton, Bristol, the son of Hugh Edward Colston and Elizabeth Edith Baker, of 5 Arlington Villas, Bristol, Gloucestershire. Educated at Clifton College between 1907 and 1911, he passed the examination for the University of London in July 1911, and then entered the City and Guilds Technical College at Finsbury in October 1911, and then took a two year course in Electrical Engineering, being awarded the College Certificate in Electrical Engineering. In October 1913 he was bound by indenture as a College Apprentice (Electrical) with The British Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company Ltd of Trafford Park, Manchester.

In August 1914 he was released from the company and from his obligation to serve as an apprentice for the full term provided in order that he might take up an appointment as an Electrical Engineer with the London County Council, however instead he then elected to join the armed forces, and in September 1914, enlisted into the newly raised Divisional Engineers for the Royal Naval Division, and went to Deal, and later the Depot Company at Blandford. Baker was however then commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant into the Territorial Force in June 1915, and posted to the 3rd/4th City of Bristol Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, a draft-finding unit for the South Midland 3rd Line Division.

Joining his battalion at Bristol, he served with it till he went overseas, being promoted to temporary Lieutenant in October 1915, and to temporary Captain in May 1916, he then proceeded to the Western Front on 27th July 1916, and was attach to the 1st/4th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, one of the battalions of the 144th Infantry Brigade, 48th South Midlands Division. Joining his unit during the Battle of the Somme, he then found himself engaged to the left of the 1st Australian Division at the Battle of Pozieres Ridge, and engaged in making good the ground to the left of the Albert-Bapaume road, and part of the Leipzig Salient.

On the night of 15th to 16th August his battalion was ordered to make an attack on German trenches north of Ovillers-La-Boiselle, and Baker went “over the top” on that evening and led his platoon in the advance on the enemy’s position. On the conclusion of these operations he was at first reported missing, but subsequently it was ascertained that he had been killed whilst gallantly leading his men forward in the assault on the villages of Ovillers-la Boiselle.’ Despite being killed in action on the night of 15th to 16th August 1916, Baker’s death is dated for the 17th August 1916, and having no known grave, he is commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial. A copied image of the recipient in uniform is included amongst the research.