A scarce to regiment Africa General Service Medal 1899-1956, EVII 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Somaliland 1902-04, awarded to Rifleman G.H. Chittenden, 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, who as a member of the 4th Battalion Mounted Infantry, saw ...

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Product ID: CMA/30590
Condition: light scuffing to obverse face, about Good Very Fine
Description:

A scarce to regiment Africa General Service Medal 1899-1956, EVII 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Somaliland 1902-04, awarded to Rifleman G.H. Chittenden, 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, who as a member of the 4th Battalion Mounted Infantry, saw service in Somaliland during the operations against the Mad Mullah in the period from 14th January to 11th November 1903. Having also seen service when with the 2nd Battalion and 1st Regiment of Rifle Mounted Infantry during the Boer War including during the relief of Ladysmith, he may also have been present in the action at Blood River Poort on 17th September 1901 when Lieutenant Llewellyn Price-Davies of his unit won the Victoria Cross.


Africa General Service Medal 1899-1956, EVII 2nd type bust, 1 Clasp: Somaliland 1902-04; (9060 PTE. G. CHITTENDEN. K.R.R.C.)

Condition: light scuffing to obverse face, about Good Very Fine.

George Henry Chittenden was born in 1877 in West Malling, Kent, and having worked as a chemical porter and a gardener, then enlisted into the British Army at Canterbury on 9th July 1895, and joining as a Rifleman (No.9060) the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Posted to the 3rd Battalion on 18th October 1895, and then to the 2nd Battalion on 15th December 1896, he joined the battalion out in South Africa. Posted to India on 6th April 1899, with the outbreak of the Boer War Chittenden returned with his battalion to South Africa on 7th December 1899, and was present during the Boer War initially with the 2nd Battalion and for a period was with the 1st Regiment of Rifle Mounted Infantry. Present during the relief of Ladysmith and the forcing of the Tugela Heights, as well as operations in the Orange Free State and the Transvaal and in action at Laing’s Nek. Chittenden may well have been present in the action at Blood River Poort on 17th September 1901 when Lieutenant Llewellyn Price-Davies of his unit won the Victoria Cross. Chittenden then transferred to the 4th Battalion on 1st May 1902, and saw service in Somaliland during the operations against the Mad Mullah which lasted from 18th January 1902 to 11th May 1904, being officially present on operations there from 14th January to 11th November 1903, when serving with the 4th Battalion Mounted Infantry. Some 147 men of the 4th Battalion received the Somaliland 1902-04 clasp to the Africa General Service Medal 1899-1956.

Posted home on 12th November 1903, Chittenden was discharged on 8th July 1907. However he then re-enlisted into the King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Maidstone on 22nd July 1907, and was discharged again on 21st July 1911. Having then gone to work as a groom for St Mark Collett at St Clare’s Park, Kemsing, near Sevenoaks, Kent, with the outbreak of the Great War, he enlisted as a Private (No.245313) into the Royal West Kent Yeomanry on 30th July 1915, and saw service with ‘C’ Company of the 2nd/1st Royal West Kent Yeomanry. Transferring to the Labour Corps for service with the 420th Agricultural Corps on 14th November 1917, he saw home service throughout the war, and was disembodied on 3rd February 1919. Additionally entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902 with clasps for Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Tugela Heights, Transvaal and Laing’s Nek, and the King’s South Africa Medal 1901-1902 with two clasps.