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A Reconquest of the Sudan 1898, South Africa Boer War and Great War Battle of the Aisne September 1914 Officer Casualty group awarded to Captain A. Horne, 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, who initially took part in the reconquest of the Sudan, ...

£2,250.00
Availability: IN STOCK
Product ID: CMA/28443
Condition: third with erased naming, otherwise Good Very Fine or better.
Description:

A Reconquest of the Sudan 1898, South Africa Boer War and Great War Battle of the Aisne September 1914 Officer Casualty group awarded to Captain A. Horne, 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, who initially took part in the reconquest of the Sudan, being present at the Battle of The Atbara on 9th April 1898, and then the Battle of Omdurman and the entry into Khartoum on 3rd September 1898, and then acted as escort with his company to Lord Kitchener en-route to Fashoda. Later present during the Boer War in South Africa on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange River Colony, and the Transvaal, he went on to win the Irish Army Point-to-Point race for heavyweights in 1906. With the Great War, he was present out on the Western Front with the British Expeditionary Force from 14th August 1914. Present during the retreat from Mons, he was however severely wounded in action on the 14th September 1914 near Vendresse during the Battle of the Aisne when involved in the advance on the Troyon Ridge. Whilst lying there in the fire zone, he was shot dead by the enemy at close quarters, as was also Private Finnie of his company who was tending to him.

Group of 6: Queen’s Sudan Medal 1897-1898; (2/LT. A. HORNE. 1/CAM: HRS:); Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 3 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal; (LIEUT. A. HORNE. 1/CAMN. HIGHRS.); King’s South Africa Medal 1901-1902, 2 Clasps: South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, naming erased; 1914 Star with Clasp; (CAPT: A. HORNE. CAM’N: HIGHRS); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (CAPT. A. HORNE.); Khedive’s Sudan Medal 1896-1908, 2 Clasps: The Atbara, Khartoum, unnamed as issued.

Condition: third with erased naming, otherwise Good Very Fine or better.

Alexander Horne was born on 30th September 1875 in Edinburgh, Scotland, the fourth son of Thomas Elliot Ogilvie Horne, a writer to the Signet. The Society of Writers to Her Majesty's Signet is a private society of Scottish solicitors, dating back to 1594 and part of the College of Justice. He was also first cousin to Major General H.S. Horne, Royal Horse Artillery, and of Lieutenant Colonel E.W. Horne, 3rd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. Educated at Saint Ninian’s Preparatory School at Moffat and then at Charterhouse School in Surrey, he originally entered the British Army Militia before obtaining his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant with the Seaforth Highlanders in 1897, and being posted to the 1st Battalion.

Horne then saw service in Egypt and took part in the reconquest of the Sudan, being present at the Battle of The Atbara on 9th April 1898, and then the Battle of Omdurman and the entry into Khartoum on 3rd September 1898. With the capture of Khartoum, Horne was then sent to Fashoda with his company acting as escort to Lord Kitchener, the Commander-in-Chief in the Sudan.

With the outbreak of the Boer War, Horne, by then promoted to Lieutenant, went on to see service in South Africa and was present on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, as well as operating on the Zululand frontier of Natal. Horne was a keen huntsman with hounds, and in 1906 won the Irish Army Point-to-Point race for heavyweights and also ran third for lightweights. He was also a member of both the Automobile and Caledonian Clubs in London.

Promoted to Captain, with the outbreak of the Great War, Horne was present with the 1st Battalion as a Company Commander out on the Western Front as part of the British Expeditionary Force from 14th August 1914, and exactly one month later, having taken part in the retreat from Mons, was severely wounded in action on the 14th September 1914 near Vendresse during the Battle of the Aisne when involved in the advance on the Troyon Ridge. Whilst lying there in the fire zone, he was shot dead by the enemy at close quarters, as was also Private Finnie of his company who was tending to him. Having no known grave, Horne is commemorated by name on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial. The clasp and roses to his 1914 Star were claimed in November 1920.