​ A rare Naval General Service Medal 1793-1840, 1 Clasp: Nassau 22 March 1808, awarded to Landsman James Tooth, Royal Navy, who having seen service aboard the 64 gun H.M.S Princess of Orange during the blockade of Texel during 1803 to 1806, was then present aboard the 64 gun H.M.S Nassau between 15th August to 20th October 1807 for the siege and bombardment of Copenhagen and capture of Danish Fleet by Admiral Gambier, and on 22nd March 1808 when in company with Stately, she captured and then destroyed the Danish 74-gun ship Prindts-Christian-F

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Product ID: CMA/22589
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A rare Naval General Service Medal 1793-1840, 1 Clasp: Nassau 22 March 1808, awarded to Landsman James Tooth, Royal Navy, who having seen service aboard the 64 gun H.M.S Princess of Orange during the blockade of Texel during 1803 to 1806, was then present aboard the 64 gun H.M.S Nassau between 15th August to 20th October 1807 for the siege and bombardment of Copenhagen and capture of Danish Fleet by Admiral Gambier, and on 22nd March 1808 when in company with Stately, she captured and then destroyed the Danish 74-gun ship Prindts-Christian-Frederic on the Jutland coast off Grenaa, before going on to finally see service aboard the 38 gun frigate H.M.S Rota at the destruction of the American privateer schooner General-Armstrong in Fayal harbour on 22nd September 1814, and for the attacks on the fort and barracks at Point Petre, St.-Mary's and up the St.-Mary's river in Canada.
Naval General Service Medal 1793-1840, 1 Clasp: Nassau 22 March 1808; (JAMES TOOTH.)

Condition: light contact wear, Good Very Fine.

Provenance: Glendinning’s Auction May 1992.
James Tooth was born in Mitcham, Surrey, circa 1784, and first appears on the Muster Rolls for the 64 gun H.M.S Princess of Orange as a volunteer in the rating of Landsman on 22nd June 1803, when aged 19, receiving two months advanced pay, and a bounty of 1/10d. Tooth was aboard Princess of Orange when she was employed off the coast of Holland off Texel in response to a scare of a possible Dutch invasion. In September 1803 Princess of Orange was ordered to the More under the command of Captain T. Rogers, and then returned to the blockade of Texel for the next five months.

On 16th December 1804, Princess of Orange had Rear Admiral O’Brien Drury come aboard to hoist his flag, and sailed as the second in command on the command on the Coast of Ireland. By May 1805, Princess of Orange was with the Channel Fleet. On 8th February 1806 Tooth transferred as a Landsman to the recently captured 64 gun H.M.S Nassau, previously the Danish warship ‘Holstein’.

Ironically Nassau then found herself employed against the Danish forces, and stationed at Yarmouth, on 26th July 1807 departed as a part of a fleet of 38 vessels for Copenhagen and was present from 15th August to 20th October for the siege and bombardment of Copenhagen and capture of Danish Fleet by Admiral Gambier. On 1st August Nassau was employed in the Great Belt, preventing Danish troops crossing to Zealand. It was however on 22nd March 1808 that Nassau, under Captain James Alexander Gordon, in company with Stately, captured the Danish 74-gun ship Prindts-Christian-Frederic on the Jutland coast off Grenaa.
On 22nd March 1808 the two British ships were cruising towards the Green Bell when they sighted Prindts-Christian-Frederic and gave chase. At 7.40 pm the Nassau got up with the Dane, commenced firing and was then joined by Stately. A running fight was maintained till 9.30 pm, when the Dane less than 500 yards from the shore, struck her colours, but before possession could be taken of her, the enemy ship grounded. The remaining part of the night was spent in removing the prisoners, but it was found impossible to refloat the captured ship. On the evening of the 23rd March, Prindts-Christian-Frederic was set on fire by her captors and shortly after blew up, just as a number of Danish Militia were approaching the area with artillery. For this action, two clasps were issued to the Naval General Service Medal 1793-1840, one reading Stately 22 March 1808 - of which 31 were claimed, and one reading Nassau 22 March 1808 - of which 30 were claimed, with James Tooth being a confirmed claimant.

Tooth then transferred as a Landsman to the 38 gun frigate H.M.S Rota on 10th November 1809, and then spent a period of time escorting convoys in Home Waters. During 1814 she escorted a convoy across the Atlantic to Jamaica. On 22nd September 1814 an attempt by the boats of the Plantagenet, Rota, and Carnation, in the road of Fayal, to cut out the American privateer schooner General-Armstrong failed, however, her own crew then destroyed the General-Armstrong by fire. By November 1814 she was back at Jamaica, and having sailed for Canada, between 13th to 15th December 1814, Rota, Devastation and Terror, along with the ships' boats, made attacks on the fort and barracks, at Point Petre, St.-Mary's and up the St.-Mary's river.
Tooth who at some stage was rated as an Ordinary Seaman, was discharged from service on 11th May 1815. James Tooth is one of two men to bear this name on the medal roll, the other being a Corporal in Royal Marines who was serving aboard H.M.S. Africa at Trafalgar. His medal is known and was sold in Sotheby’s in November 1903.


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