A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 5 Clasps: Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, reverse with ghost dates, awarded to Private D. Dalton, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who came from Hacketstown, County Carlow, Ireland, and saw service in India between 1890 and 1897, being then recalled for the Boer War, he was present on operations in the Cape Colony, followed by forcing of the Tugela Heights and the relief of Ladysmith in February 1900, followed by further operations in the Orange Free S

Price: £295.00


Product ID: CMA/26924
Condition: Extremely Fine
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Description:

A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 5 Clasps: Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, reverse with ghost dates, awarded to Private D. Dalton, 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who came from Hacketstown, County Carlow, Ireland, and saw service in India between 1890 and 1897, being then recalled for the Boer War, he was present on operations in the Cape Colony, followed by forcing of the Tugela Heights and the relief of Ladysmith in February 1900, followed by further operations in the Orange Free State and the Transvaal.

Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 5 Clasps: Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, reverse with ghost dates; (3328 PTE D. DALTON, RL. DUBLIN FUS:)

Condition: Extremely Fine.

Denis Dalton was born in Hacketstown, County Carlow, Ireland, and having worked as a shoemaker and seen three years service with the local militia, then attested for service with the British Army at Dublin on 28th June 1889, joining as a Private (No.3328) the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Posted to the 1st Battalion on 16th August 1889, and to the 2nd Battalion out in India on 19th September 1890, then committed a serious offence, as he was tried and imprisoned by Court Martial on 25th March 1892, being only returned to duty on 25th September 1892. Dalton was posted home on 1st February 1897 and was transferred to the Army Reserve on 6th February 1897. Dalton still managed to get in trouble with the authorities when he was convicted of being absent and drunk and sentenced to 14 days hard labour for each case from 30th June to 27th July 1898.

With the outbreak of the Boer War, Dalton was recalled on for service on 7th October 1899, and then posted to the 1st Battalion on 9th October 1899, and embarked for South Africa on 10th November 1899, being then present on operations in the Cape Colony, followed by forcing of the Tugela Heights and the relief of Ladysmith in February 1900, followed by further operations in the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. Posted home on 7th January 1901, he was discharged on 23rd August 1902. Medal and clasp entitlement confirmed.