A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 4 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, awarded to Private T. Polwarth, 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, who served under an alias, his real name being John Patterson, who then saw service during the reconquest of the Sudan in 1898, and during the Boer War on operations in the Cape Colony and the Orange Free State, and in action at Johannesburg on 31st May 1900 and Diamond Hill on 11th to 12th June 1900. Latterly he saw service during the Great War with the 1st Battalion,

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Product ID: CMA/25735
Condition: Very Fine
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Description:

A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 4 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, awarded to Private T. Polwarth, 1st Battalion, Cameron Highlanders, who served under an alias, his real name being John Patterson, who then saw service during the reconquest of the Sudan in 1898, and during the Boer War on operations in the Cape Colony and the Orange Free State, and in action at Johannesburg on 31st May 1900 and Diamond Hill on 11th to 12th June 1900. Latterly he saw service during the Great War with the 1st Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers, out on the Western Front with the British Expedition Force from September 1914 to February 1915, and latterly served with the 20th Labour Company, Labour Corps.

Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 4 Clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill; (3815 PTE T. POLWARTH, 1ST CAM’N. HIGHRS:)

Condition: Very Fine.

Thomas Polwarth, an alias, his real name being John Patterson, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, and having worked as a farm servant, then attested for service with the British Army at Inverness on 1st August 1896, joining as a Private (No.3815) the Cameron Highlanders. Posted to the 2nd Battalion, and then to the 1st Battalion, he saw service in Gibraltar from 29th September 1897, followed by Egypt from 4th October 1897.

Polwarth was present during the operations leading to the reconquest of the Sudan in the battle of The Atbara on 8th April 1898, and the battle of Omdurman and the entry into Khartoum on 2nd September 1898. Returning to garrison duty in Egypt, with the outbreak of the Boer War, Polarth was posted to South Africa on 3rd March 1900. Present on operations in the Cape Colony and the Orange Free State, and in action at Johannesburg on 31st May 1900 and Diamond Hill on 11th to 12th June 1900, he was then posted home and discharged on 11th October 1902.

Having gone back to work as a farm servant, he then re-enlisted into the British Army at Ayr, Scotland, on 8th January 1906, joining as a Private (No.8745) the Royal Scots Fusiliers. Posted to the 2nd Battalion on 14th April 1906, he was appointed to Lance Corporal on 4th August 1906, and then posted to the 1st Battalion on 19th November 1906, and was eventually transferred to the Army Reserve on 14th March 1913.

With the outbreak of the Great War, Polwarth was mobilised on 5th August 1914, and then posted to the 3rd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers on 6th August 1914, being appointed to Lance Corporal on 3rd September 1914, and then posted to the 1st Battalion out on the Western Front on 11th September 1914. Polwarth was deprived of his Lance Stripe ‘for drunkenness’ on 8th January 1915 and was then posted home to the Depot on 4th February 1915, and was appointed to Lance Corporal again on 9th July 1915.

Transferring as a Lance Corporal (No.446050) to the Labour Corps in 1916, Polwarth saw service with the 20th Labour Company from 8th November 1916 and was promoted to Corporal on 19th April 1917. He appears to have been retained in service post war.