A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 2 Clasps: Cape Colony, Paardeberg, awarded to Corporal F.G. Cameron, 2nd Battalion, the Royal Highlanders - the Black Watch, who having been almost certainly involved in the Battle of Magersfontein on 11th December 1899, during which his battalion suffered heavy casualties, was then killed in action at the Battle of Paardeberg on 18th February 1900, when the Highland Brigade made an advance towards Boer positions on the banks of the Modder River, crossing some 2000 yards of open coverless ground to do so,

Price: £650.00


Product ID: CMA/25742
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
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Description:

A Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 2 Clasps: Cape Colony, Paardeberg, awarded to Corporal F.G. Cameron, 2nd Battalion, the Royal Highlanders - the Black Watch, who having been almost certainly involved in the Battle of Magersfontein on 11th December 1899, during which his battalion suffered heavy casualties, was then killed in action at the Battle of Paardeberg on 18th February 1900, when the Highland Brigade made an advance towards Boer positions on the banks of the Modder River, crossing some 2000 yards of open coverless ground to do so, and advancing through a hail of lead.

Queen’s South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 2 Clasps: Cape Colony, Paardeberg; (6142 CPL F.G. CAMERON. 2ND RL: HIGHLDRS:)

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Frederick G. Cameron was born in Dundee, but thereafter “spent most of his life with his friends in Kent”, prior to enlisting into the British Army at Woolwich on 17th August 1895, and joining as a Private (No.6142) the Royal Highlanders - the Black Watch. Posted to the 2nd Battalion, with the outbreak of the Boer War he then saw service in South Africa.

Almost certainly involved in the Battle of Magersfontein on 11th December 1899, during which his battalion suffered heavy casualties, he had been promoted to Corporal, and took part in operations in the Cape Colony, before being present at the Battle of Paardeberg on 18th February 1900, when he was killed in action.

The 2nd Black Watch formed part of the 3rd Highland Brigade in the 9th Division, and numbered 649 men at the beginning of the action. At about 6 am the Highland Brigade was ordered to advance towards the Modder River at Paardeberg Drift to clear the Boers from the area which fringed its left bank. By so doing, the brigade had to cross some 200 yards of open coverless ground. They did this under a hail of lead from their invisible enemy in the river banks. The 2nd Black Watch reached the river - though it was in spate and said to be unfordable. The first to cross, was Piper Duncan Cameron, who gained the Distinguished Conduct Medal for doing so, and he was closely followed by men in groups who had linked their arms together having hung their ammunition pouches around their necks, the water being up to their waists. Three companies of the Black Watch made it across, together with a company of the Seaforths.

Moving forward, these companies then came under a sharp fire. Other elements of the forces then managed to cross at other places, and the Boers were driven from their positions on the river bank. A charge was then put in by the Highland Brigade, but this failed to achieve its objective, and the positions were held through the dark. At dawn on the 19th February, the Boers were found to have evacuated their positions.

Corporal Cameron was however one of 13 men of the 2nd Black Watch to be killed in action at the Battle of Paardeberg on 18th February 1900, and his obituary appeared in The People’s Journal - Dundee edition, of 24th February 1900.