A good Second World War Bomber Command Lancaster Pilot 1944 operations Distinguished Flying Cross group awarded to Flight Lieutenant W.J. Treharne, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, later Royal Air Force, who is known to have flown operationally on a tour of duty with 625 Squadron in Lancaster bombers as a part of No.1 Group between August and December 1944, and completed 28 operational sorties, attacking many targets in Germany, including Dortmund, Essen, Stuttgart, Dusseldorf, Stettin and Kiel. He achieved outstanding results and his ability

Price: £2,475.00


Product ID: CMA/28441
Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

A good Second World War Bomber Command Lancaster Pilot 1944 operations Distinguished Flying Cross group awarded to Flight Lieutenant W.J. Treharne, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, later Royal Air Force, who is known to have flown operationally on a tour of duty with 625 Squadron in Lancaster bombers as a part of No.1 Group between August and December 1944, and completed 28 operational sorties, attacking many targets in Germany, including Dortmund, Essen, Stuttgart, Dusseldorf, Stettin and Kiel. He achieved outstanding results and his ability to hit the target was proved time and again by the most successful photographs that have been obtained at the time of bombing, some 48 of which are included amongst the assorted ephemera. He later flew in Civil Aviation, as the pilot of Britannia aircraft for British United Airways, and circa 1963 became the chairman of the British Air Line Pilots’ Association, a position be most right up to the time of the British United Airways pilots’ strike of 1968.

Group of 5: Distinguished Flying Cross, GVI 1st type cypher, reverse dated 1945, with Royal Mint fitted presentation case; 1939-1945 Star; Air Crew Europe Star with France and Germany Clasp; Defence Medal; War Medal; last four with the card box of issue, this with the address not removed, but a photograph of the recipient in later life pasted to it, and including the Air Council campaign medal forwarding slip and the issue chit confirming entitlement.

Condition: Nearly Extremely Fine.

Together with the following:

Buckingham Palace forwarding slip for the Distinguished Flying Cross, typed details for: ‘Flight Lieutenant William J. Treharne, D.F.C.’

British Empire Aviator’s Certificate as issued by the Royal Aero Club, No.21521, issued on 2nd August 1946 to William John Treharne.

United Kingdom Ministry of Aviation Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence No.23707, issued to William John Treharne, covering the period from 26th January 1966 to 27th January 1968. With pass photo of recipient. Confirming that he can be the pilot in command of the following aircraft: Auster variants, Proctor variants, Britannia 100/300 and Bristol 170. Also that he can be co-pilot of the following aircraft: Canadair C.4, Comet IV, Dakota C.47, York 685, and the Supertrader.

48 original aerial photographs of bombing sorties, all take from Treharne’s aircraft, many major targets shown in both France and Germany including Cologne, some excellent images of bomb strikes, all bearing dates, most appear to be from 1944.

Wartime Royal Air Force Pilot’s wings.

Royal Air Force side cap, complete with brass insignia. Slight moth damage.

A tin of Royal Air Force brass buttons.

Aristo Aviat Flight Computer as used by pilots for inflight calculations. This complete with its original leather case, inscribed in ink on the inside: ‘Capt Treharne BUA’ for his time as a pilot with British United Airways which existed from 1960 to 1970.

An Aircraft Navigation Computer.

William John Treharne was born on 31st January 1920 in Redruth, Cornwall, and saw service during the Second World War being commissioned from the ranks as a Sergeant (No.1387521) to Pilot Officer (No.127348) with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve on 5th August 1942 for service with the General Duties Branch as aircrew, and was then promoted to Flying Officer on 5th February 1943.

Subsequently operating as a pilot in Lancaster bombers, with 625 Squadron, part of No.1 Group, Bomber Command. Treharne flew operationally as a pilot on a tour of duty between late August and early December 1944, but is believed to have previously flown operationally, though possibly as aircrew other than a pilot, which may explain the existence of the Air Crew Europe Star, which was issued till June 1944, and which is confirmed in his entitlement. He would be promoted to Flight Lieutenant on 5th August 1944.

Treharne’s tour of operations as a pilot began with a sortie to Kiel on 26th August, and he then flew a sortie to Vincley on 28th August. On 29th August he attacked Stettin, and on 3rd September it was Gilze-Rijen. On the 6th, 8th and 10th September he bombed Le Havre, and then on 12th September attacked Frankfurt. On 16th September he bombed Rheine-Salzbergen, and on 20th September it was Calais. Then on 23rd September he attacked Dusseldorf, before Calais again on the 26th September. On 11th October he attacked Frederie-Hendrik, and on the 14th and then 15th October he bombed Duisburg. On 19th October he bombed Stuttgart, and on 23rd October it was Essen. On 31st October he attacked Cologne, and on 2nd November it was Dusseldorf followed by Bochum on the 4th November. Then on 6th November he attacked Gelsenkirchen, and on 16th November bombed Duren. On 18th November he attacked Wanne Eickel, and on 21st November attacked Aschaffenburg. Then on 27th November he bombed Freiburg, and on 29th November bombed Dortmund. On the 3rd December he was tasked to bomb the Urft Dam, but in this case returned home with bombs as order. Then finally on 6th December he bombed Merseberg-Leuna.

The recommendation for his award of the Distinguished Flying Cross was made on 11th December 1944, and reads as follows: ‘Flight Lieutenant Treharne is the Captain and Pilot of a Lancaster aircraft and has completed a most successful first operational tour comprising 28 sorties and 129 operational flying hours. He has taken part in attacks against many heavily defended targets including Dortmund, Essen, Stuttgart, Dusseldorf, Stettin and Kiel, and pressed home his attacks regardless of enemy opposition. Throughout his tour this Officer has consistently shown the very highest qualities of skill and devotion to duty and his never failing cheerful manner has been a fine inspiration to the remainder of the crew. His record of achievement is most praiseworthy and despite heavy opposition, and on several occasions bad weather, he has always cheerfully completed the task in hand with the utmost zest instilling a high state of morale into his crew. He has on occasion flown with new crews on their first operational flight and his encouragement and confidence has been a magnificent inspiration. This officer has achieved outstanding results and his ability to hit the target has been proved time and again by the most successful photographs that have been obtained at the time of bombing. For the successes he has achieved and for the fine example of leadership displayed during his tour, I strongly recommend Flight Lieutenant Treharne for an award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.’

Treharne was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in the London Gazette for 23rd March 1945. Treharne remained in service post-war, and having transferred into the Royal Air Force, whilst still with the General Duties Branch transferred into the Royal Air Force Reserve of Officers on 4th September 1953. He relinquished his commission on cessation of duty on 2nd November 1954. After leaving the service, Treharne continued to fly in civil aviation, and is known to have flown for British United Airways, a company which existed between 1960 and 1970, he being noted for his United Kingdom Ministry of Aviation Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence as issued in January 1966, as being qualified as a pilot of Auster variants, Proctor variants, Britannia 100/300 and Bristol 170 aircraft, and as a co-pilot of Canadair C.4, Comet IV, Dakota C.47, York 685, and the Supertrader aircraft. He is known to have flown in Britannia aircraft for British United Airways according to Flight Magazine and as of circa 1963 was appointed the chairman of the British Air Line Pilots’ Association, a position be most right up to the time of the British United Airways pilots’ strike of 1968.