A fine Canadian Great War Third Battle of Ypres Military Medal and casualty group awarded to Private later Acting Sergeant W.S. Hodgson, 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the 90th Winnipeg Rifles, who despite his family being from Ontario, was himself born in Brooklyn, New York where his father worked as a machinist for Thomas Edison. Moving back to Canada, he then grew up in Peterborough, Ontario, and having briefly seen home service with the 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles at the time of the Boer War in 1902, then later worked as a civil engineer

Price: £550.00


Product ID: CMA/25990
Condition: slight edge bruise to first at 7 o’clock, otherwise Good Very Fine.
Availability: IN STOCK
Description:

A fine Canadian Great War Third Battle of Ypres Military Medal and casualty group awarded to Private later Acting Sergeant W.S. Hodgson, 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the 90th Winnipeg Rifles, who despite his family being from Ontario, was himself born in Brooklyn, New York where his father worked as a machinist for Thomas Edison. Moving back to Canada, he then grew up in Peterborough, Ontario, and having briefly seen home service with the 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles at the time of the Boer War in 1902, then later worked as a civil engineer on the Canadian Pacific Railway, and during the Great War, was present with the 8th Battalion out on the Western Front from late June 1916, being then serving on attachment to the 1st Canadian Composite Pioneer Company from January 1917, he was wounded in action by gunshot wound to the back at Ypres on 18th November 1918, and spent the remainder of the war in England, being notably treated at the Pavilion Hospital in Brighton. Hodgson was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in the London Gazette for 23rd February 1918, indicative of an award won during the Third Battle of Ypres.

Group of 3: Military Medal, GVR bust; (101168 PTE W.S. HODGSON. 8/CAN:INF:); British War Medal and Victory Medal; (101168 A.SJT. S. HODGSON. 8-CAN.INF.)

Condition: slight edge bruise to first at 7 o’clock, otherwise Good Very Fine.

Together with three of the recipient’s original identity tags, two attached to the original neck cord - one the aluminium one, stamped: ‘PTE W S HODGSON 101168 CANADIAN P 8 BN’, the other being pressed card and stamped: ’101168 W S HODGSON 8 CDN BAT P’, another in the form of an aluminium identity disc for wear on the wrist, this stamped: ‘W.S. HODGSON 101168 C.C.T.C. CANADA’.

Also with the recipient’s original Canadian ‘For Service at the Front’ Badge, reverse numbered: ‘47060’ and complete with screw backing plate. Finally there is also a magazine cutting bearing an image of the recipient in later life and his his obituary as taken from the Journal of the Quarter Century Club.

Walter Sydney Hodgson, known as Wally, was born on 5th April 1882 in the United States of America at Brooklyn, New York, his father, having been originally born in Saint Mary’s, Ontario, he then gone to work as a machinist for the celebrated Thomas A. Edison in New York. The family however then moved back to Canada, where Wally was settled with his parents in Peterborough, Ontario, and was there educated at the West Ward School, the Central School and finally the Peterborough, Collegiate, and then went to work in the stores department of the Canadian General Electric company in Peterborough from 14th May 1899.

With the outbreak of the Boer War, Hodgson saw service as a Trooper with the 6th Canadian Mounted Rifles for six months during 1902, but did not see active service and remained in Canada throughout. Returning to his first job on his release from the army, in 1904 he then went to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway in the freight department at Fort William. Later transferring to the engineering department of the Canadian Pacific Railway, he then worked as a civil engineer on construction work both at Fort William and Port Arthur, as well as at Winnipeg and Calgary.

With the outbreak of the Great War, Hodgson who had by then been widowed, then attested for service with the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Edmonton, Alberta on 12th August 1915, as a Private (No.101168) with the 66th Overseas Battalion. Arriving in England on 7th May 1916, he then embarked for the Western Front on 28th June 1916 and there joined the 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion - the 90th Winnipeg Rifles.

Attached to the 1st Canadian Composite Pioneer Company on 17th January 1917, he was then present during the Third Battle of Ypres, and was wounded in action by a gunshot wound in the back on 18th November 1917 at Ypres, and transferred to England for treatment. From 23rd November 1917 he was being treated at the Pavilion Hospital in Brighton, and was still there when news came through of his award of the Military Medal for bravery in the field, the award being published in the London Gazette on 23rd February 1918, and indicating an award won during the Third Battle of Ypres between October and November 1917, quite possibly being earned on the day he was wounded in action on 18th November 1917.

Hodgson was with the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearance Depot at Seaford when he was appointed to Acting Sergeant on 28th November 1918, he having never returned to the front, and he was then returned to Canada on 26th June 1919 and discharged on 13th July 1919.