​The fine Northern Ireland and Falklands War Mount Tumbledown Sniper Casualty group awarded to Lance Corporal N.R. Eyre, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, who was serving with ‘F’ Company, when he was hit by sniper fire near the top of Tumbledown on 14th June 1982, during the crucial battle the night before the Argentine surrender, ‘with wounds to his head, back and arm he lay beneath a rock in snow and hail for about an hour and on the way back a mortar went off a few feet away, the shrapnel hitting him in the mouth.

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Product ID: CMA/21072
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The fine Northern Ireland and Falklands War Mount Tumbledown Sniper Casualty group awarded to Lance Corporal N.R. Eyre, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, who was serving with ‘F’ Company, when he was hit by sniper fire near the top of Tumbledown on 14th June 1982, during the crucial battle the night before the Argentine surrender, ‘with wounds to his head, back and arm he lay beneath a rock in snow and hail for about an hour and on the way back a mortar went off a few feet away, the shrapnel hitting him in the mouth.

General Service Medal 1962, 1 Clasp: Northern Ireland; (24425327 LCPL N R EYRE SG); South Atlantic Medal 1982 with Rosette; (24425327 L CPL N R EYRE SG), mounted court style as worn.

Condition: Good Very Fine.

Together with a copied image of F Company, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards at Chelsea Barracks in September 1983, with Lance Corporal Eyre identified sixth from right; and a copy of a newspaper cutting titled ‘Falklands Wounded Back on Duty’ this containing an image of Eyre and others ‘back on duty at Chelsea Barracks yesterday after recovering from wounds suffered in the Falklands’. The accompanying article confirms that Eyre was hit by sniper fire near the top of Tumbledown during the crucial battle the night before the Argentine surrender – ‘with wounds to his head, back and arm he lay beneath a rock in snow and hail for about an hour before being ordered to move back. “On the way back a mortar went off a few feet away. The shrapnel hit me in the mouth” he said. Most of the shrapnel was removed during an operation n the hospital ship The Uganda.’

Awarded to Lance Corporal (No.24425327) N.R. Eyre, 2nd Battalion, Scots Guards, who came from Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, and saw service in Northern Ireland and then in the Falklands War in 1982.

On 2 April 1982, Argentina, then under a dictatorship led by General Galtieri, invaded the British territory of the Falklands Islands off South America. The British soon assembled a large array of Royal Navy warships, Royal Fleet Auxiliaries and merchant ships and headed south for Ascension Islands. On 25 April, the island of South Georgia, off Antarctica was recaptured and on 1 May the RN Carrier Battle Group had entered the 200-mile (370 km) Total Exclusion Zone (TEZ) which had been placed around the Falklands. On 12 May the 2nd Battalion, as part of the 5th Infantry Brigade, embarked aboard QE2, which had been requisitioned by the Government for use as a troopship, and departed Southampton for South Georgia. In the early hours of the 21 May D-Day began with 3 Commando Brigade (including two Para battalions) landing unopposed at San Carlos water and successfully established a bridgehead.

In late May the QE2 arrived at her destination but because she could not be risked by moving her closer to the Falklands, most of 5th Brigade were transferred to the P&O liner SS Canberra who would then take them to their destination. On 2 June, Canberra anchored in San Carlos Water, and subsequently the Guards were landed at San Carlos by LCU, a day after the 1st/7th Gurkhas had been landed by LCU from the ferry Norland. On 5 June the Scots Guards were embarked aboard the assault ship H.M.S. Intrepid before being transferred to the ship's four LCUs who transported them to Bluff Cove. On 8 June the 1st Welsh Guards were aboard RFA Sir Gallahad also waiting to be landed at Bluff Cove when Sir Galahad and RFA Sir Tristram were attacked by Argentinian Skyhawk fighters who proceeded to hit both ships. Sir Galahad was terribly hit and both ships caught fire, causing terrible casualties aboard Sir Galahad. Forty eight people, including thirty two Welsh Guards, were killed and many were wounded, many suffering from terrible burns. Unfortunately, only 200 survived.

On the morning of 13 June the Scots Guards were moved from their positions at Bluff Cove by helicopter to an assembly area near Goat Ridge near to their objective, Mount Tumbledown, which was defended by a crack Argentinian unit, the 5th Marine Infantry Battalion. On the night of the 13th the main force of the Scots Guards began its advance on the western side of Mount Tumbledown. During the course of the battle in the early hours of the 14th, men of the battalion launched a bayonet charge on the stout Argentinian defenders which resulted in bitter and bloody fighting, and was one of the last bayonet charges by the British Army. The battle raged on and by 8:00 am the final objective was taken and Mount Tumbledown was in the hands of the Scots Guards. The battle had been bloody, yet successful, and the battalion had proven the elite calibre and professionalism of the regiment in taking a well-defended mountain, defended by a top Argentinian unit, for it had been performing public duties back in London only a few months before. The Scots Guards casualties were eight Guards and one Royal Engineer killed, and forty three wounded. Their Argentinian opponents lost forty men and over thirty captured.  

Eyre was serving with ‘F’ Company in the assault on Mount Tumbledown in the early morning of 14th June 1982 when he was wounded in action, being hit by sniper fire ‘near the top of Tumbledown during the crucial battle the night before the Argentine surrender. With wounds to his head, back and arm he lay beneath a rock in snow and hail for about an hour before being ordered to move back. “On the way back a mortar went off a few feet away. The shrapnel hit me in the mouth” he said. Most of the shrapnel was removed during an operation on the hospital ship The Uganda. After being flown home from Montevideo, more treatment was carried out at the Queen Elizabeth Military Hospital, Woolwich. After 10 weeks Cpl Eyre was fit and on duty again.’ Eyre was subsequently photographed in the ‘F’ Company group photograph taken at Chelsea Barracks in London in September 1983.


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